Literature

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  • How Not To Be Wrong

    800 CEO Read
    Michael
    17 Jul 2014 | 12:33 pm
    TweetI must preface this review by letting you know that I am not the kind of person inclined to read a book about mathematics. I have very little background in math—if I remember correctly, my undergraduate education required two courses. Despite my typically non-mathematical disposition, How Not To Be Wrong called to me from the shelf. “When am I going to use this?” This is the quintessential complaint-cum-question from elementary school students the world over. It is also the introduction to Jordan Ellenberg’s new book dedicated to explaining exactly when and how we can and do use…
  • 50 Shades Illogical

    Bizzybiz Blog
    23 Jul 2014 | 1:49 pm
    I read and review Fifty Shades Freed so you don't have to.I don't even know where to begin. Maybe with the question I kept thinking over and over during this last section: I'M SORRY, WHAT?????E.L. James spends the last two numbered chapters of her book trying to wrap everything up in a neat little package. SPOILER ALERT: SHE FAILS. Instead what happens is she creates more questions than she answers, and the few things she does answer have explanations that make NO SENSE. I mean, AT ALL. Seriously, even working from within the horrifying stereotypes she's set out for her characters and "why…
  • Why Can’t the English?

    The Horn Book
    Roger Sutton
    27 Jul 2014 | 11:08 am
    We saw Dawn of the Planet of the Apes last night–ehh. Some the intra- and inter-species encounters were quite moving and dramatic but the plot was on automatic and the fabulously watchable Judy Greer was wasted (she could have been completely blotto given that all she had to do was lie there with a suffering look in her ape-eyes). Before the movie began there were about five different plugs for The Giver, including three of the quiz questions, so somebody is looking out for you, Lois*. Courtesy of the Kindle Daily Deal, I’m re-reading one of The Giver‘s greatest antecedents,…
  • 28 Jul 2014 | 10:22 am

    NYT > Books
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:22 am
  • Book News: The Clash Of The Comic(-)Cons

    Books
    Annalisa Quinn
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:21 am
    Also: an excerpt of Haruki Murakami's new book; notable books coming out this week.» E-Mail This
 
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    Books

  • Book News: The Clash Of The Comic(-)Cons

    Annalisa Quinn
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:21 am
    Also: an excerpt of Haruki Murakami's new book; notable books coming out this week.» E-Mail This
  • 'Love And Drowning' In The U.S. Virgin Islands

    NPR Staff
    27 Jul 2014 | 2:11 pm
    In the Land of Love and Drowning, the islands are a magical setting for three generations of one family living through the modern history of the territory as it passes from Danish to American hands.» E-Mail This
  • What Made Double Agent Kim Philby A Great Spy? His Friends.

    27 Jul 2014 | 5:11 am
    Philby was one of the 20th century's most legendary spies. NPR's Arun Rath talks with author Ben Macintyre about his new book, A Spy Among Friends, and the boozy secret to Philby's success.» E-Mail This
  • A Foodie Detective Solves Crime In A Delectable Italian Mystery

    Rosecrans Baldwin
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:03 am
    Andrea Camilleri's Angelica's Smile is the 17th book in the Inspector Montalbano mystery series. It's not as tightly plotted as the others, but Camilleri's trademark charm is still in place.» E-Mail This
  • Lessons From Behind The Counter At A Comic Book Store

    Lidia Jean Kott
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:03 am
    NPR's Lidia Jean Kott talked to Jason Aaron, the writer of the new female Thor. When she first talked to him she knew nothing about superhero comics, but after some research she became a fan.» E-Mail This
 
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    The Book Designer

  • Gone Fishing…

    Joel Friedlander
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:01 am
    …well, not really. Thanks for stopping by. We’re taking a break from the blog today but we’re still busy working away behind the scenes on lots of great things to help authors self-publish. Make sure you check back again on Wednesday. You won’t want to miss the latest article from our Contributing Writer, Jason Matthews about how to help readers find your books on Amazon. And, on Sunday, of course, we’ll be sharing with you more great articles about writing and self-publishing that have been published over the week, in our next This Week in the Blogs post. But,…
  • Self-Publishing: Carnival of the Indies Issue #46

    Joel Friedlander
    27 Jul 2014 | 12:01 am
    Welcome to this issue of the Carnival of the Indies blog carnival. This issue is for July, 2014. We welcome your submissions on topics related to writing, self-publishing, book design or marketing books. A collection of outstanding articles recently posted to blogs, your reading here will be richly rewarded. See the end of this post for links to submit your blog posts for the next carnival, or for participating Bloggers and Featured Bloggers to grab your sidebar badges. Thanks to everyone who participated. Featured Posts Belinda Pollard presents Why are book editors so expensive?? posted at…
  • Do You Know Who Owns Your Book Cover?

    Joel Friedlander
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:01 am
    By Helen Sedwick You understand the importance of an eye-catching book cover. You spend hours (and dollars) designing, tweaking, and testing. In the end, you, the self-publishing author, own your book cover, right? Then how does this happen? Or this? Or this? Don’t assume someone is stealing here. These look-alikes were probably innocent and unfortunate errors. Someone did not do their homework. If big-name publishers make these mistakes, then self-publishers are more at risk. How can the self-publishing writer avoid a look-alike cover? Here’s how. Avoid non-exclusive, ready-made covers.
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    Chronicle Books Blog

  • Pinball Wizard

    Ryan Hayes
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:47 am
    Across the bay from San Francisco on Alameda Island there is a museum dedicated solely to the fast-paced, coin-operated, heart-stopping, glass-covered game of pinball. Lining the walls of the Pacific Pinball Museum are dozens of pinball machines, with some dating all the way back to the 1870s. Each machine serves as a sort of pop-culture time capsule, with technologies and aesthetics hearkening back to the era in which it was made. And the best part—almost all of the machines are set to “Free Play.” As I played my way through the museum on a recent visit, I began to notice the…
  • Demotivational Grumpy Cat Poster: Print for Free!

    Sabrina Barekzai
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:33 am
    Hang in there? Turn that frown upside down? Grumpy Cat doesn’t approve of motivational posters. Click on the photo below to download a free, printable demotivational poster to hang in your office, kitchen, or right above your bathroom mirror. The Grumpy Guide to Life will be hitting bookstores on August 5th. Pre-order it today!
  • Back-to-School Gift Guide

    Beth Faris
    25 Jul 2014 | 10:39 am
    Back-to-school season is right around the corner. We’ve collected some of our favorite items from around the Web to make this your child’s best year yet! Don’t forget to order your personalized school supplies from MyChronicleBooks by early August to get them before school starts. Ivy & Bean Lunch Box – Now your child can take Ivy & Bean to school with this custom lunch box that includes a chalkboard inside for special notes. (MyChronicleBooks) Colored Smencils – Yum, smencils! Get 5 scented colored pencils made from recycled newspapers and enjoy lots of giggles during…
  • We’re Packing Our Bags for San Diego Comic-Con!

    Albee Dalbotten
    21 Jul 2014 | 3:48 pm
    This is a week we look forward to all year. It’s San Diego Comic-Con! You’ll find us scoping out the amazing costumes, keeping our eyes peeled for celebs, and hunting down cool treasures, as always. Bonus! This year we’ll also be celebrating Goodnight Darth Vader, which goes on sale while we’re at the show. You can see the full schedule of signings and events on our Comic-Con page, but here’s a teaser of some fun stuff at our booth: Freebies including Goodnight Darth Vader posters, temporary tattoos inspired by The Bounty Hunter Code, Inside Game of Thrones 2 bookmarks,…
  • Street Food Journal Giveaway

    Patricia Quan
    21 Jul 2014 | 11:57 am
    Everyone eats, and everyone enjoys a satisfying meal. The foodie tribe continues to grow, and its members are constantly on the hunt for their next good meal. The Street Food Journal is a charming diary for collecting delicious memories. In addition to 128 blank pages, the journal is also punctuated by lovely watercolors by Sophia Augusta of street foods and food trucks, making it the ultimate place for adventurous travelers to record their lucky finds and foodie favorites. Tell us what your favorite street food is in the comments below for a chance to win your own copy of The Street Food…
 
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    Bookslut

  • Dangerous Books: From Banning Ulysses to Challenging Huck Finn

    6 Jul 2014 | 10:13 pm
    When Bennett A. Cerf, the publisher of Random House, acquired the U.S. rights to Ulysses, a fraught odyssey detailed in Kevin Birmingham's fascinating book, The Most Dangerous Book: The Battle for James Joyce's Ulysses, Cerf risked jail time for distributing...
  • Sun Bear by Matthew Zapruder

    6 Jul 2014 | 7:13 am
    zapruder matthew sun bear
  • An Interview with Ariel Schrag

    6 Jul 2014 | 3:31 am
    The most burning question in my mind as cartoonist and writer Ariel Schrag sat down across from me in a Brooklyn diner was, "Am I the cat girl?" She laughed. "Maybe!" I was not satisfied by this answer. There's...
  • Michelangelo: A Life in Six Masterpieces by Miles J. Unger

    6 Jul 2014 | 2:03 am
    unger miles j michelangelo
  • A Closed Loop

    6 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    On a very ordinary day, you might consult the world around you as to what comes next. What I have understood, what I haven't. What of these books I've read. Truth to tell, I read nothing, or read things through...
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    800 CEO Read

  • Friday Links

    Ryan Schleicher
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:42 pm
    Tweet➻ Ted Coiné is on a mission to perpetuate the idea that ethical leadership practices will lead companies to the promise land. In a piece on Switch & Shift titled “Leadership Ethics: It doesn’t depend”, Coiné writes that Ethics today save you money tomorrow. But that’s not all. Ethics today makes you more money, every day of the year, for generations. Because your workers at all levels care, and so they pitch in with zest to make your company great. They think about improving your firm all week long, and they bring those off-hour innovations to work. They bring you their…
  • ChangeThis: Issue 119

    dylan
    23 Jul 2014 | 12:30 pm
    Tweet The Most Important Company In the World: Intel, Moore’s Law, and the Heartbeat of Civilization by Michael S. Malone “We now live differently, learn differently, communicate differently, an ultimately, think differently. … We have internalized Moore’s Law. Its beat is now our heartbeat; its pace of change is now the heartbeat of civilization.” The Road (to Reinvention) Is Calling by Josh Linkner “Companies, communities, and individuals fall for many reasons, but one of the most common—and easily avoidable—is the failure to reinvent. Those who feel the most secure in the…
  • How Not To Be Wrong

    Michael
    17 Jul 2014 | 12:33 pm
    TweetI must preface this review by letting you know that I am not the kind of person inclined to read a book about mathematics. I have very little background in math—if I remember correctly, my undergraduate education required two courses. Despite my typically non-mathematical disposition, How Not To Be Wrong called to me from the shelf. “When am I going to use this?” This is the quintessential complaint-cum-question from elementary school students the world over. It is also the introduction to Jordan Ellenberg’s new book dedicated to explaining exactly when and how we can and do use…
  • Jack Covert Selects – The Intel Trinity

    dylan
    11 Jul 2014 | 10:59 am
    Tweet The Intel Trinity: How Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove Built the World’s Most Important Company by Michael S. Malone, Harper Business, 560 page, $34.99, Hardcover, July 2014, ISBN 9780062226761 The Mark Zuckerbergs and Steve Jobs of the world have received an enormous share of the past decade’s business and cultural limelight, and with good reason: they, along with a growing number of Silicon Valley tech innovators, have altered how we as individuals exist within a larger cultural context, how we gather and digest information, and how we interact with one another. Often…
  • Jack Covert Selects – How the World Sees You

    dylan
    11 Jul 2014 | 10:55 am
    Tweet How the World Sees You: Discover Your Highest Value Through the Science of Fascination by Sally Hogshead, HarperBusiness, 428 pages, $29.99, Hardcover, ISBN 9780062230690, July 2014 The massive amount of research that went into Sally Hogshead’s new book, How the World Sees You, is staggering. For the past decade, she’s been scouring books and source materials, conducting polls and surveys with hundreds of thousands of people, and working with teams in the real world social labs of companies like AT&T, General Electric, and Cisco to discover how fascination works in both the…
 
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    Charles Petzold

  • Seeing Mieczysław Weinberg’s “The Passenger”

    16 Jul 2014 | 4:23 am
    The opera begins rather innocently: It is 1960, and we’re on the deck of an English cruise ship. A German couple are sailing to South America. He is a diplomat taking up a new post. She is his loving wife, though somewhat prone to brooding. ... more ...
  • Reading Amir Alexander’s “Infinitesimal”

    28 Jun 2014 | 1:56 pm
    For as long as I can remember, I have been skeptical about the existence of infinity. I just don’t see any evidence of infinity in the real world. The Big Bang caused only a finite amount of matter and energy to come into being, and the amount can actually be estimated. The number of atoms in the universe is about 1080, and while that’s certainly quite a lot, it’s still short of infinite. Since space is defined by these particles, there is no infinite space either. ... more ...
  • Cut the Mic

    4 May 2014 | 10:26 am
    I see a lot of live music, and by “live” I mean I’m in the same room as the musicians, and some of the light rebounding off the musicians and their instruments goes directly into my eyes. The musicians aren’t shot by video cameras and then projected onto TV screens, for example. That would be pointless. ... more ...
  • I Have Cracked the 3D Pedagogical Nut!

    4 Feb 2014 | 1:21 pm
    There is nothing quite so immediately gratifying as graphics programming. Specify a few coordinates in a program, and you can draw a line right on the screen. From there you can build it up, add curves, enclose and fill areas, and experiment with different types of brushes. Start animating the coordinates and colors, and you're off. ... more ...
  • Character Formatting Extensions with DirectWrite

    28 Jan 2014 | 4:00 am
    Yes, it's true. I suffered from glyphophobia — the irrational fear of glyphs and glyph runs. My glyphophobia began over 10 years ago when I started exploring the Windows Presentation Foundatation. I managed to suppress this fear sufficiently when called upon to do some work involving parsing and rendering XPS documents, but still the fear persisted, causing distinct shivers of anxiety whenever I encountered something involving glyphs. ... more ...
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    The Millions

  • Craft Work

    Thomas Beckwith
    28 Jul 2014 | 11:00 am
    It’s the kind of niggling question that drives a writer mad: is it best to edit a piece after you finish a draft, or is it better to edit while you write? At Electric Lit, Lincoln Michel argues for the latter, on the grounds that it lets writers fix endemic problems before it’s too late. You could also read Lincoln’s 2010 Millions review of the movie Avatar.
  • Tabloid Fodder

    Thomas Beckwith
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    “Sitting down to read The Actress, Amy Sohn’s newest novel, is even better than standing in line at the grocery store while the person in front of you disputes the price of a carton of orange juice, giving you extra time to read the tabloids. The Actress might be as licentious as a tabloid, but it is far more intelligently written. And, you probably won’t be reading it while standing in line inside a grocery store.”
  • Bookshelves Ten Feet High

    Thomas Beckwith
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    Chances are you’ve bragged about the size of your library. The number of books you own is a point of pride for many readers. But at what point does collecting books — which few people would say is a bad thing– turn into a problem? At what point, in other words, does it become hoarding? Pair with: Rebecca Rego-Barry on hunting for rare books at college library book sales.
  • The Son

    Thomas Beckwith
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    He befriended Mark Twain. His father wrote The Scarlet Letter. He drank wine with Oscar Wilde, George Eliot and Henry James, and William Randolph Hearst once hired him as a reporter. He even published a few books to critical acclaim. So why do so few of us know anything about Julian Hawthorne? In the WaPo, Michael Dirda reviews a new biography. (h/t Arts and Letters Daily)
  • The Book That Wasn’t: 5 Fiction Writers Talk About their Novels in Drawers

    Chloe Benjamin
    28 Jul 2014 | 3:14 am
    “For every book I publish,” a writing teacher once told me, “there’s one book I don’t.” At the age of eighteen, armed with a truly bad novel and a rather absurd sense of optimism, this line did not exactly resonate. But as I amassed rejection slips of every size—and once my first novel was rejected by a pantheon of New York publishers—I realized that nearly every writer has a novel in a drawer: a manuscript that, due to any number of reasons (rejection, timing, chance, diversion) never quite becomes a fully-formed book.  By the time an author’s debut hits bookstores, it’s…
 
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    Opinions of a Teen Who Reads

  • I am the Messenger: Review

    24 Jul 2014 | 6:02 pm
    Author: Markus ZusakAge range: 13-17Content: Moderate romance, no sexual content, high language, moderate violenceGenre: Teen Fiction / Tough StuffPublisher: Random House Children's BooksPages: 368Where to get it: Barnes & Noble, Amazon, Target, Half-Price BooksSynopsis:Ed Kennedy, an underage cab driver, pathetic card player, and useless romantic, lives in a shabby shack and is hopelessly in love with his best friend, Audrey. His life is one of peaceful routine and incompetence. Until, one day, he accidentally stops a bank robbery. That's when the first Ace…
  • The Eye of Minds: Review

    20 Jul 2014 | 6:16 pm
    Author: James DashnerAge range: 13-17Content: No romance, no sexual content, mild language, moderate violenceGenre: Teen Science Fiction / Teen FantasyPublisher: Random House Children's BooksPages: 320Where to get it: Barnes & Noble, Amazon, Target, Half-Price BooksSynopsis:Michael is a gamer. And, like most gamers, he spends more time in the VirtNet than the actual world. The VirtNet offers total mind and body immersion, a horrifying yet addicting experience. Thanks to technology, anyone with money can enter fantasy worlds, risk their lives without fear of death, or…
  • BZRK: Revisited Review

    13 Jul 2014 | 2:57 pm
    Author: Michael GrantAge range: 13 & upContent: Moderate romance, mild sexual content, high language, moderate violenceGenre: Teen Science Fiction / Teen Action AdventurePublisher: EgmontUSAPages: 416Where to get it: Barnes & Noble, Amazon, Target, Half-Price BooksSynopsis:A war over the control of the human mind breaks out. Charles and Benjamin Armstrong are grotesquely conjoined twins and owners of the Armstrong Fancy Gifts Corporation. They have a goal to turn their world into their vision of a utopia; no war, no conflicts, no hunger, and no free will. Opposing…
  • Trin the YouTuber

    8 Jul 2014 | 2:10 pm
    I have an announcement.And it has nothing to do with books.As you may or may not know, I have a little sister. She's twelve years old (as of yesterday, happy late birthday, rascal) and she's honestly the cutest little button ever. This announcement regards her.Trinity, being the bubbly, determined, little dream-chaser that she is, has launched her very own YouTube channel where she plans on doing makeup, tips and tricks, chit-chatty, and lifestyle videos. She's done two videos so far and I think she's done a very good job. I am extremely, extremely proud of her. It takes guts to put yourself…
  • TFiOS

    25 Jun 2014 | 9:23 am
    As you probably know already, The Fault in Our Stars by the one and only, John Green has been made into a major motion picture and premiered at the beginning of this month. Am I reviewing a movie? I honestly don't know. But here we go...The director is Josh Boone. The screenplay was written by Scott Nestaudter and Micheal H. Weber. The release date (in America) was June 6, 2014. Although, where I live, there were some special night before showings on the 5th. So, even though there were earlier showings, I went to the first midnight showing with my best friend who had to introduced me to…
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    Personanondata

  • MediaWeek (Vol8, N 29): Amazon, The LMS, Director's Cut, Open Access + More

    PersonaNonData
    21 Jul 2014 | 10:23 am
    Read these articles on flipboard: From the NYTimes: Amazon, a Friendly Giant as long as it's fed.“Everything Amazon has promised me, it has fulfilled — and more,” he said. “They ask: ‘Are you happy, Vince? We just want to see you writing books.’ Changes ahead for the humble learning management system (Inside Higher Ed)“I think we’re in a weird place right now in the marketplace -- partly because there’s a lot of parity between the systems,” Severance said. “You can almost throw a dart at a dartboard and pick an LMS, and it won’t be that bad.”Andrew Ladd at The…
  • Photo: High school throw back.

    PersonaNonData
    3 Jul 2014 | 8:47 am
    Biggish reunion this weekend.  At one point there were five Michaels in this class.
  • Mary Meeker's 2014 Internet Trends Report

    PersonaNonData
    1 Jul 2014 | 10:00 pm
    KPCB Internet trends 2014 from Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers
  • MediaWeek (V8, N26) Dangerous Literature, Newspapers, Ranking Publishers, MOOC Feedback + More

    PersonaNonData
    29 Jun 2014 | 3:47 pm
    More here: Personanondata - The Magazine  via @flipboardFrom The Chronicle of Higher Ed, a discussion on when books were dangerous:The American Library Association, which designates the final week of September as Banned Books Week, has no problem finding titles to fill its annual lists of books under siege. However, these are generally books that have been removed from particular libraries or schools, not the kind of total proscription imposed on Ulysses, as well as Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Tropic of Cancer, Naked Lunch, Lolita, and other works that have since become staples of…
  • Image: Dutch Haven 1970 Pennsylvania

    PersonaNonData
    14 Jun 2014 | 2:03 pm
    I don't know what a shoo-fly pie is but it must have something to do with wind mills.  I believe this place is still there.
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    Blogposts | The Guardian

  • Commonwealth Games 2014: day five live!

    Jacob Steinberg (a heroic 1-6pm stint) and Daniel Harris (the glory 6-10pm stint)
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:20 pm
    Live updates from all the action in GlasgowEmail daniel.harris.casual@theguardian.comSarah Adlington loses gold medal in x-ray machine Not just fun, says English cylcing's Shane SuttonTake a look at today's highlights and scheduleAnd keep an eye on the full medal table 8.20pm BST "Re: Michael Johnson", begins David Wall, like he's discussing a court case. "Like a lot of the comments btl on that interview said he's one of the better commentators/ pundits (and not just of athletics). But how is it that the BBC are able to get him for major tournaments? I understand that US…
  • Gaza crisis: Netanyahu warns of extended military campaign ahead live

    Tom McCarthy in New York
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:19 pm
    Israeli prime minister omits talk of ceasefireOfficials: at least 10 killed in Gaza camp and hospital attacksNine Israeli soldiers killed, army saysRead the latest blog summary 3.19pm ET As our live blog coverage continues, here's a summary of where things stand: 2.57pm ET Harriet Sherwood reports that eight of the ten people killed in the attack on a Gaza camp were children: Eight children playing in a Gaza refugee camp were killed, its main public hospital was struck, four Israelis were killed in a mortar attack' and militants from Gaza infiltrated Israel through a cross-border…
  • Lloyds condemned after rigging cost of Bank of England rescue scheme - business live

    Graeme Wearden
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:16 pm
    Lloyds penalised for manipulating the fees paid for liquidity assistance set up to save the bank during the financial crisis.Afternoon summaryBank of England governor: Conduct is highly reprehensible and clearly unlawfulFCA: Lloyds colluded at expense of the taxpaperLloyds trader joked: Every Little Helps....Lloyds fine -- details start here 8.16pm BST We've also learned tonight that Lloyds has suspended seven staff over the conduct that led to today's £218m fines.My colleague Jill Treanor reports:Among those suspended by Lloyds on Monday were three of the four unnamed individuals cited…
  • Lloyds repo men default on the moral payments

    Nils Pratley
    28 Jul 2014 | 11:42 am
    Lloyds Banking Group will pay £7.76m to compensate the Bank of England, after some employees lied about 'repo' ratesDid you think traders at Lloyds and Bank of Scotland would be grateful that taxpayers stumped up £20bn to save their banks in 2009? Ho, ho. Their first instinct, of course, was to try to fiddle the terms of the banking bailout and rip off the Bank of England.That the trading desks of the two banks were up to their necks in the wider Libor-rigging scandal was known already. The "highly reprehensible" element in revelations, as Bank governor Mark Carney put it, is…
  • The real reason French women have stopped sunbathing topless

    Morwenna Ferrier
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:45 am
    According to French Elle, women have stopped sunbathing topless in France. Two French women reveal why they do, and don't, and how little it has to do with health scaresIs topless sunbathing over? It certainly is in France, according to French Elle, if the coverline on its new summer issue is to be believed: "La Fin Du Topless Sur La Plage?" which translates, verbatim, to "Is this the end of toplessness on the beach?" According to the magazine the answer is "yes", and the reasons are threefold. First, an increased concern over health and the dangers of skin…
 
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    ReadySteadyBlog

  • From Communism to Capitalism

    2 Jul 2014 | 5:26 am
    Just out from Bloomsbury, Michel Henry's From Communism to Capitalism: Theory of a Catastrophe (translated by Scott Davidson): Both a unique witness of transformative events in the late 20th century, and a prescient analysis of our present economic crises from a major French philosopher, Michel Henry's From Communism to Capitalism adds an important economic dimension to his earlier social critique. It begins by tracing the collapse of communist regimes back to their failure to implement Marx's original insights into the irreplaceable value of the living individual. Henry goes on to apply this…
  • Where is our Graham Harman?

    20 Jun 2014 | 6:02 am
    As I tried to make very clear in my post on Sunday, the small and contained argument that I'm advancing is not that serious and interesting writing about books is not happening online. Categorically, it is. I listed five blogs and bloggers in my original Guardian post – This Space, David Winters, 3:AM, Flowerville, Time's Flow Stemmed – and in my follow up blog, I listed several more – John Self, Berfrois, LARB and Dan Green. Very many more wonderful book-related spaces and places could be mentioned – The Quarterly Conversation and HTMLGiant both deserve a shout, as do Marooned Off…
  • Writing in a Digital Age

    15 Jun 2014 | 3:04 am
    I was honoured to be invited to speak at The Literary Consultancy's Writing in a Digital Age conference yesterday. (A particular personal pleasure because I got to see Lynne Hatwell and Sam Leith again, and it had been far too long in both cases.) Huge thanks to the organisers for inviting me. Seemed to be a very vibrant and well run affair, and I enjoyed the discussion immensely. The conference was the occasion for writing this piece (What became of literary blogging?) for the Guardian last Monday. It was the subs at the Guardian who framed the piece thus: I hoped that blogs could provide an…
  • Musical Sunday

    15 Jun 2014 | 2:05 am
    Two music-related books to get me through Sunday... Clothes, Clothes, Clothes. Music, Music, Music. Boys, Boys, Boys by Viv Albertine (she of The Slits; if you don't know, you probably won't care, but maybe you should – she writes well about "art school, squatting, hanging out in Sex with Vivienne Westwood and Malcolm McLaren, spending a day chained to Sid Vicious, on tour with The Clash, and being part of a brilliant, pioneering group of women making musical history"). And Emily Petermann's The Musical Novel: Imitation of Musical Structure, Performance, and Reception in Contemporary…
  • The politics of depression

    12 Jun 2014 | 5:04 am
    I’ve suffered from depression intermittently since I was a teenager. Some of these episodes have been highly debilitating – resulting in self-harm, withdrawal (where I would spend months on end in my own room, only venturing out to sign-on or to buy the minimal amounts of food I was consuming), and time spent on psychiatric wards. I wouldn’t say I’ve recovered from the condition, but I’m pleased to say that both the incidences and the severity of depressive episodes have greatly lessened in recent years. Partly, that is a consequence of changes in my life situation, but it’s also…
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    Litopia All Shows

  • The Greatest Escape

    Litopia Writers' Colony
    26 Jul 2014 | 12:53 pm
    You may think you know about World War Two… but you don’t. Tonight you’ll find out why. Featuring blistering contributions from our special guests Peter Grose, author of The Greatest Escape, and journalist & WWII maven, Neill Denny. Scintillating conversation and scorching debate… from Boy Scouts to Gaza, from Obamacare to Style Nazis (what?). Provocative, informative, addictive. See you next week, Litopians! Download the show as an audio file Subscribe in iTunes If you enjoy Litopia's FREE shows, please help us to keep going by making a donation!
  • Pukes of Hazard – Rebellion Special

    Litopia Writers' Colony
    26 Jul 2014 | 12:16 pm
    In a Rebellion-themed special edition, Garry is joined by punk ukulele-pluckers the Pukes, who have risen from London pub strummers to festival stalwarts. There are brand new songs from the Old Firm Casuals and The Boys, the new single from Louise Distras and quality tracks from Operation Two Fold, Infa-Riot, Madball, Section 60, Speakeasy and the Skoisters. Of course no show would be complete without some 2-Tone nostalgia, this time from The Selecter. Remember – we’re keen to discover, play and support new bands and new talent – send us a music submission via the link on the website!
  • The Devil – Leo Tolstoy

    Litopia Writers' Colony
    25 Jul 2014 | 6:18 am
    St Matthew is going to poke out your eyes. Or some such. After what seemed like a millennium of exile from the Motherland, we go back to the heart (and other parts) of Russian literature with a Tolstoy short story. Brilliant.
  • American Pastoral - Philip Roth

    Litopia Writers' Colony
    7 Jul 2014 | 9:36 am
    Feel like making glove?? That's not a typo. This week we discuss perhaps the best passage in any of Philip Roth's novels, the 'glovemaking scene' (again, not a typo) in American Pastoral. And we do this with American lit scholar and Gloversville, NY native, Menachem Feuer. Also, we discuss the definition of a schlemiel, a person who could never make a glove. And Franz Kafka makes an appearance at the end – another person we can safely assume was not versed in the art of glovemaking, IN ANY SENSE OF THE WORD. Get that hand out of your pocket and put your headphones on. *heat*.
  • A True Novel - Minae Mizumura

    Litopia Writers' Colony
    6 Jul 2014 | 3:31 am
    A novel that says it’s based on Wuthering Heights is taking a risk – because Wuthering Heights is a crazy effective soporific. But the further it strays from the original, the better A True Novel becomes. Don’t underestimate your originality, Minae Mizumura! You’ve produced an eminently entertaining read. In a nice turn, this very long book is actually quite short. Picture by Toshihiro Gamo
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    Omnivoracious

  • The Enduring Hunt for Nazi War Criminals

    Neal Thompson
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:25 pm
    Next year marks the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, yet the search for Nazi perpetrators continues--as does the publication of books about Nazi hunting, even as the last of them die out. On Wednesday, an 89-year-old Philadelphia man died just hours before a judge ordered his extradition to Germany for his role in the gassing of 216,000 Jews at Auschwitz. Johann Breyer, who served as an armed guard at the notorious concentration camp, was accused of being an accessory to murder, in what will likely be one of the last Nazi cases on American soil. Nicholas Kulish's recent…
  • The Men (and Women) Who Knew Too Much: History's Most Notorious Spies

    Jon Foro
    25 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    Nobody knows spies like Ben Macintyre. With Double CrossAgent Zigzag, and Operation Mincemeat, the London-based author established himself as the master chronicler of spooks and subterfuge, a biographer of the most eccentric personalities ever to dwell in the shadows of diplomacy. (Macintyre is also a regular dweller of our Best of the Month lists.) His latest, A Spy Among Friends, tackles the story of the man who may have been the most damaging double-agent in history: Kim Philby, Britain's top spy-hunter charged with catching Soviet moles, who all the while spilled deadly secrets to…
  • American Spymaster

    Jon Foro
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    Meet Jack Devine. Something of a real-life George Smiley, he is a 30-year veteran of the CIA who, among a lot of things, ran Charlie Wilson's war against the Soviets in Afghanistan, knew a thing or two about the Iran-Contra affair long before the rest of us did (including the president?), and tangled with some of the agency's most notorious double-agents. In Good Hunting: An American Spymaster’s Story, Devine has written a fascinating memoir of his time overseeing the agency’s spying operations, while also critiquing its policies and direction--arguing that covert ops (i.e.
  • YA Wednesday: Rainbow Rowell on "Landline," the 90s, and Disney theme parks

    Seira Wilson
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:22 am
    It's no secret that I'm a huge fan of Rainbow Rowell and when I met her in person a month ago, it only confirmed my suspicion that she's as fabulous in person as the books she writes.  Her latest, Landline, is classified as an adult book, but like her YA titles, there is no set age required for entry.   Landline tells the story of a marriage floundering in the wake of career, kids, and the daily grind.  Rowell uses a trick of time to allow her main character, Georgie, to revisit how she and husband Neal found each other and the final hurdle that resulted in a…
  • Horses of the Apocalypse: Scott Cheshire's American Epic

    Kevin Nguyen
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    A blurb from Philipp Meyer hails Scott Cheshire's debut novel, High as the Horses' Bridles, as "a great new American epic." At first glance, the page count of Bridles seems too slim to be an epic. But within its swift 300 pages, Cheshire's thematic scope is cast wide, capturing a number of deeply intertwined American ideas. In many ways, the book is a lens into the expanse of American faith and how unshakable it is, even when that relationship is conflicted. From its opening pages, Bridles is heavily doused in apocalyptic language. Twelve-year-old Josiah Laudermilk delivers a doomsday…
 
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    Fresh Fiction

  • Elaine Viets | Feline Magic

    SaraReyes
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:39 am
    No cozy is complete without a cat. Mysteries have talking cats, crime-solving cats, and in Sofie Kelly’s Magical Cats series, felines walk through doors and materialize in strange places. Sofie’s cats transported her series to the New York Times bestseller list. My Dead-End Job mysteries also have cats. Thumbs is a six-toed polydactyl cat who […]
  • Joan Johnston Update – THE BAREFOOT BRIDE

    SaraReyes
    26 Jul 2014 | 11:53 am
    One of my favorite historical western romances, THE BAREFOOT BRIDE, was just reissued and is now in stores in paperback with a fabulous new cover. This is yet another mail-order bride story, about a Boston widow who comes all the way to Fort Benton, Montana to meet her country doctor husband. Read more… For so […]
  • Chris Culver | What My Infant Son Has Taught Me About Suspense

    Pasha Carlisle
    21 Jul 2014 | 10:50 am
    When people ask me what I do for a living, nine times out of ten I tell them I’m a stay-at-home dad. And that’s true, mostly—I do watch my son most of the day. I’m only a writer from about ten at night to midnight when my wife and little boy are asleep. When my […]
  • Happy Birthday Week to The Page Girls

    Pasha Carlisle
    21 Jul 2014 | 9:47 am
    The staff here at Fresh Fiction are excited to wish The Page Girls a happy first birthday week! The Page Girls is a new online mag with an emphasis on books, cocktails, and female friendships. Each week, they publish a themed issue containing short stories, book reviews, personal and funny essays, videos, cocktail recipes, and […]
  • Jennifer Barnhart | The Dawn of Dystopian

    Pasha Carlisle
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:54 pm
    Over the weekend, The Dawn of the Planet of the Apes raked in a staggering 73 million dollars. The majority of the audience was over the age of 25. Part of this could be the nostalgic appeal of the series. The Planet of the Apes first appeared in print in 1963 and film in 1968. […]
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    Latest blog entries

  • #ReadISLA Flashback: Lola And The Boy Next Door

    19 Jul 2014 | 6:09 am
      Hey guys, today we're hanging out with Lola and Cricket!   Budding designer Lola Nolan doesn’t believe in fashion...she believes in costume. The more expressive the outfit--more sparkly, more fun, more wild--the better. But even though Lola’s style is outrageous, she’s a devoted daughter and friend with some big plans for the future. And everything is pretty perfect (right down to her hot rocker boyfriend) until the dreaded Bell twins, Calliope and Cricket, return to the neighborhood. When Cricket--a gifted inventor--steps out from his twin sister’s shadow and back into…
  • YA Authors as YAs: The Megan Whitmer Edition + Giveaway (US/Canada)

    17 Jul 2014 | 11:13 am
      Welcome to the latest YA Authors as YAs interview Our goal? To prove that your favorite authors — no matter how AWESOME and COOL you think they are — were once awkward, weird, and they geeked out about fandoms and guilty-pleasure music JUST LIKE YOU when they were teens. (Most of them still do, you know, and that’s totally COOL, because being yourself is the ultimate in EPIC COOLNESS.) Don’t believe me?  Maybe Megan Whitmer, author of BETWEEN, coming your way from Spencer Hill Press on July 29, 2014, can convince you with tales from her teen…
  • Check out the trailer for PADDINGTON!

    11 Jul 2014 | 7:19 am
      PADDINGTON   We're so happy to bring you the trailer for PADDINGTON, based on the beloved children's book by Michael Bond, arriving this Christmas!   You know you need a good dose of *bathroom* humor this morning, right? Enjoy! And keep your eyes peeled for PADDINGTON this winter.     About the Film   This Christmas, a small bear will make a big splash. From the beloved novels by Michael Bond and producer David Heyman (HARRY POTTER), PADDINGTON tells the story of the comic misadventures of a young Peruvian bear who travels to the city in search of a…
  • It's live!! Cover Reveal: Charmed by Michelle Krys + Giveaway (International)

    10 Jul 2014 | 4:33 am
      Welcome to this week's cover reveal! Today we're super excited to celebrate the cover reveal for CHARMED by Michelle Krys, releasing May 26, 2015 from Delacorte Press/Random House Children's Books. Before we get to the cover, here's a note from Michelle:   Hello, lovely YABC-ers!   If it seems as though HEXED only just released, that’s because it did. But believe it or not, it’s already time to reveal the cover and jacket copy for CHARMED, the sequel and final book in the Witch Hunter series!    Simply put, I love this cover. CHARMED is about Indie giving…
  • #ReadISLA Flashback: Anna And The French Kiss

    8 Jul 2014 | 9:53 am
    Bonjour ami! Je suis heureux que vous soyez ici, j'aime votre visage!   Okay, so, my French is a little rusty, but fingers crossed that I just said,     Hello friends! I'm glad you're here, I like your face!   Today, we're taking a little trip down memory lane, back to where our liaison amoureuse began with Anna And The French Kiss! I read Anna in the summer of 2011 while sitting poolside, laughing out loud and earning myself quite a few curious glances. By the time I finished, I was ready to pack my bags and jet off to Paris!   Anna is looking forward to her senior…
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    The Horn Book

  • Reading about WWI

    Katie Bircher
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:30 am
    One hundred years ago today, the first shots of World War I were fired. These books about the WWI era — fiction and nonfiction for a range of ages — are all recommended by The Horn Book Magazine and The Horn Book Guide. Picture Books The text of Timothy Decker’s unusual picture book The Letter Home is a letter from a medic serving on the front lines during World War I to his young son back at home. A mood of sometimes ironic calm pervades both the spare, observant letter and the laconic black-and-white drawings, which depict the terrors of war in childlike terms: “Sometimes we…
  • Review of I Can Do It Myself

    Robin Smith
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:19 am
    I Can Do It Myself by Valorie Fisher; 
photos by the author Preschool, Primary    Schwartz & Wade/Random    40 pp. 7/14    978-0-449-81593-9    $17.99    g Tiny poseable dolls help young children celebrate the many concepts they need to learn. Fisher (Everything I Need to Know Before I’m Five, rev. 7/11) includes the basics for preschoolers and kindergartners: left and right; how to hold a pencil; writing numbers and letters; counting; recognizing shapes, colors, and patterns; and the basics of dressing and eating. Little plastic dolls and toys are photographed against…
  • Why Can’t the English?

    Roger Sutton
    27 Jul 2014 | 11:08 am
    We saw Dawn of the Planet of the Apes last night–ehh. Some the intra- and inter-species encounters were quite moving and dramatic but the plot was on automatic and the fabulously watchable Judy Greer was wasted (she could have been completely blotto given that all she had to do was lie there with a suffering look in her ape-eyes). Before the movie began there were about five different plugs for The Giver, including three of the quiz questions, so somebody is looking out for you, Lois*. Courtesy of the Kindle Daily Deal, I’m re-reading one of The Giver‘s greatest antecedents,…
  • Week in Review, July 21st-25th

    Katie Bircher
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:00 pm
    This week on hbook.com… Summer 2014 Board Book Roundup Let’s Get Lost author Adi Alsaid Talks with Roger Reviews of the Week Picture Book: Pom and Pim by Lena Landström; illus. by 
Olof Landström; trans. from 
the Swedish by Julia Marshall Fiction: Like No Other by Una LaMarche Nonfiction: Little Roja Riding Hood by Susan Middleton Elya; 
illus. by Susan Guevara App: Shout Science! Read Roger: “A winter’s tale,” or, Roger goes to the movies: thoughts on Snowpiercer “He must have been pissed.” archival snark from former HB editor Paul Heins Out of the…
  • Frog Fridays booklist

    Elissa Gershowitz
    25 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    Leapin’ lizards! (Oh, wait.) Here are some nonfiction books and picture books about our “phavorite” amphibians. Nonfiction Arnosky, Jim All About Frogs 32 pp. Scholastic 2002. ISBN 0-590-48164-9 (Gr. K-3) This book informs with a definition of amphibians, the differences between frogs and toads, identifying markings on various species, anatomical features, habits, and how frog spawn develop into frogs. The well-organized expository prose lends itself to reading aloud, with each double-page spread covering a topic. The detailed captions may be lost on groups, but the…
 
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    The Fine Books Blog

  • "The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec"

    Rebecca Rego Barry
    28 Jul 2014 | 5:28 am
    The Museum of Modern Art in New York opened this weekend a show of more than 100 posters, lithographs, printed ephemera, and illustrated books by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, the French artist often credited with bringing the avant-garde to the masses.  Widely published in journals and magazines, his art depicted the cultural life of late nineteenth-century Paris--cabarets, salons, brothels. It is first exhibition at MoMA since 1985 dedicated solely to Lautrec, and most is from the museum's own collection (donated, in large part, by the Rockefeller family). Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec…
  • Germany Digitizes 700,000 World War I Documents

    Nate Pedersen
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:27 pm
    To mark the centenary of WWI, the German government has digitized and made freely available 700,000 documents related to the war on the website of the Federal Archive. The material includes audio recordings, films, and photos in addition to an array of personal and governmental documents. Records of politicians, military and civilian authorities, propaganda films, and even personal letters from the front are all part of the newly accessible treasure trove.Curators at the Federal Archive said the material will be of particular benefit to genealogists as it includes…
  • Controversies at the National Library of India

    Nate Pedersen
    21 Jul 2014 | 10:50 pm
    Is the National Library of India destroying rare books after they have been digitized?  Is the library roof leaking rainwater on books and newspapers?  The Times of India reported last month that the National Library of India has "turned into a dumping ground."Newspaper informants revealed that books were being torn apart page by page in digitization efforts and that the pages were dumped after the digitization process was completed.Another informant discussed the deplorable condition of the building's roof:"Many portions of the ceiling are broken. During monsoon, water seeps in and…
  • History Professor Guides Readers & Collectors

    Jeremy Howell
    20 Jul 2014 | 8:19 pm
    The Country Bookshop in Southern Pines, North Carolina, not far from the world famous Pinehurst No. 2 golf course, has an expert stocking its shelves. Bill Maher, a retried history professor, gets people coming back to the shop for one reason: He knows his stuff. Antiquarian book collectors sometimes forget that there is another class of book collector. These collectors do not collect books for their beauty or rarity but rather attempt to assemble a collection that represents mankind's current state of understanding of a particular topic. Sometimes misidentified as readers, these collectors…
  • Literary Saratoga Springs

    Rebecca Rego Barry
    17 Jul 2014 | 6:06 pm
    Saratoga Springs, NY. All spas and horse-racing, right? Not so. Certainly there is racing (the Stakes open Friday), but ballet and literature are giving the horses a run for their money in this historic town. The New York City Ballet holds a mini summer season there, and the Bolshoi will make its debut at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center on July 29. There is also the National Museum of Dance. The New York State Summer Writer's Institute, held this year from June 30-July 25 at nearby Skidmore College, brings a decidedly literary element to town. Where else might the bookies--I mean,…
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    Smart Bitches, Trashy Books

  • Books on Sale: Historical Favorites from Kleypas, Heath and More

    sarah@smartbitchestrashybooks.com
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:30 am
    by SB Sarah RECOMMENDED: Secrets of a Summer Night by Lisa Kleypas is $3.99. This is the first book in the Wallflower Quartet, one of Kleypas' most beloved series. If you've never read Kleypas, she is one of the most talented historical writers: her use of language and her characters, heroes in particular, are extraordinary. This book has a 4+ star average on GR, too.  It would be a lovely present for yourself, or a historical fan you know. Four young ladies enter London society with one common goal: they must use their feminine wit and wiles to find a husband.So a daring…
  • The Making of a Susanna Kearsley Cover - Plus Giveaway

    sarah@smartbitchestrashybooks.com
    27 Jul 2014 | 11:00 pm
    by SB Sarah On Saturday, Susanna Kearsley's The Firebird  ( A | BN | K | ARe ) won the RITA® for Best Paranormal at the 2014 RWA convention. While I had no idea that was going to happen, I'm a little extra excited, because I'd been working on a Q&A with the Sourcebooks art and productions departments about the making of her covers, and had planned to post it today. Yay for timing!  Season of Storms is Kearsley's newest novel, and it comes out on 2 September 2014 - and yes, it is up for preorder now at Amazon and BN. Kearsley's cover art is pretty…
  • Surrey International Writers Conference - Surrey, BC, Canada

    sarah@smartbitchestrashybooks.com
    27 Jul 2014 | 6:00 pm
    by SB Sarah   I'm a guest of the Surrey International Writers' Conference this year, held in Surrey, BC, Canada, October 24-26, 2014. I'll be presenting on reviews and on social media, but even more exciting are the other guests, including Chuck Wendig, Liza Palmer, Susanna Kearsley, and many others. If you're attending the Surrey conference, I hope you'll stop and say hi!  Categories: Events
  • Romance Writers of Australia 2014 Conference

    sarah@smartbitchestrashybooks.com
    27 Jul 2014 | 12:06 pm
    by SB Sarah There is no such thing as too many Tim Tams, right? I'm headed back to Oz August 5-10 for the 23rd annual Romance Writers of Australia conference. I'm presenting a pre-conference intensive workshop on media interaction with Jennifer St. George and Helene Young, and I'll be attending the rest of the conference as well.  If you're attending, I hope you'll stop me and say hi. And yes, I have more stickers of The Ladies for the Aussies, too!  Categories: Events
  • Podcast Transcript 100: More Books for Young Readers, Beta Heroes, and a Surprise for Jane

    sarah@smartbitchestrashybooks.com
    27 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    by SB Sarah Here is a text transcript of Podcast 100. More Books for Young Readers, Beta Heroes, and a Surprise for Jane. You can listen to the mp3 here, or you can read on!  This podcast transcript was handmade with the finest tools by Garlic Knitter. Many thanks.  Here are the books we discuss: [music] Sarah Wendell: Hello, and welcome to the 100th episode of the Dear Bitches, Smart Author podcast. Yay! I’m Sarah Wendell from Smart Bitches, Trashy Books, and with me is Jane Litte and all of you again! In this week’s episode, we have more recommendations for young…
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    London Review of Books

  • Letters

    30 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    The letters page from London Review of Books Vol. 36 No 15 (31 July 2014)
  • Jenny Diski: In the Stationery Cupboard

    30 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    The subtitle of Nikil Saval’s book is curiously inapt. Cubed is not a ‘secret history of the workplace’, but the not (entirely) secret history of a very particular kind of workplace. The main title is intended to pull that particular workplace into focus, I suppose, to narrow the vast number of possible workplaces down to a single square box (or latterly a three-walled lidless box) that will inevitably bring to mind the environment of the white-collar pen-pusher, although it has been a very long time since office workers reliably wore white collars or pushed pens to fulfil their duties.
  • Hal Foster: Jeff Koons

    30 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
  • Adam Shatz: Robbe-Grillet’s Bad Thoughts

    30 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    By the time he was elected to the Académie française in 2004, Alain Robbe-Grillet had suffered a cruel fate: he had all the renown he could have hoped for but few readers to show for it. The literary movement he’d launched half a century earlier – the nouveau roman – had ground to a halt. The new novel – anti-psychological and anti-expressive, stripped of individualised characters, temporal continuity and meaning itself – was no longer new. Like the total serialism championed by his contemporary Pierre Boulez, it seemed all the more dated for heralding a future that had failed to…
  • Mouin Rabbani: Israel mows the lawn

    30 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
 
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    McSweeney’s

  • The Association for the Study of Romantic Letters Presents the First Annual Conference On How to Tell Samantha I Really Like Her by Jason Edward Harrington

    28 Jul 2014 | 4:01 am
    CALL FOR PAPERSTheme: To Pass Her a Note, or to Digitally Approach Her? That is the Question.Date: Today after school.Venue: My house.Keynote speakers: Whoever can give me decent advice.The life and times of Samantha first became a subject of romantic studies during Ms. Connor’s third period AP English class, when a smile from Samantha caught critical attention. Thus began a search for previously overlooked encouraging signals produced by Samantha, resulting in a corpus of mentally cataloged gestures now considered canonical.I cordially invite all friends and experts in the study of…
  • Teddy Wayne’s Unpopular Proverbs: Hay by Teddy Wayne

    28 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Make hay while the sun shines, though we’ve also installed new solar-simulacrum paneling all over the geodesic dome to enable twenty-four-hour hay production. You’ll be on the night shift; we expect you here at nine every night, and you can clock out at five in the morning. After a year on the job, assuming we’re all on the same page and you’ve hit the appropriate milestones, you’ll be considered for the morning shift, which also comes with health care.
  • Hungover Bear and Friends: Saved By Criticism by Ali Fitzgerald

    28 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    - -
  • McSweeney’s Internet Tendency’s Week in Review: July 21-25, 2014 by McSweeney's

    27 Jul 2014 | 7:20 am
    This was the week we considered erotica for architects while producing sex-drenched music mixes for exercising moms. We wrote banner ads for medicated wipes and wondered why women’s apparel catalogs want their customers to go paddleboarding before eating tacos. We unearthed excerpts from hipster romance movies, wrote more engaging Ten Commandments, and tried to decipher Eminem lyrics from lesbian poetry. We also thought about launching a podcast (in the near future at least) and expounded on the joys of working in an office in the summertime.- -I’m Thinking About Launching My…
  • I Produce Sex-Drenched Uptempo Club Bangers to Inspire Moms at 6 AM Boot Camp Classes by Jenny Shank

    25 Jul 2014 | 4:01 am
    Some club music producers want to write hits that will make every hardbody in South Beach thrust their pelvises on the dance floor in ecstatic abandon. But not me. I compose grooves for the moms who take 6 AM boot camp classes at community rec centers in places such as Naperville, Illinois, where my music plays in the background to their workout routines. My songs can be found on battered compilation CDs next to the rec center gym’s sound system, ready for any instructor who forgets to bring an iPod.When I sing “I want to pump you, pump you, pump you with my love muscle”…
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    Podiobooker

  • New release! Listening In Our Circumstances

    Evo
    16 Jul 2014 | 8:01 pm
    Rick Hoover has produced another spirituality book. This time it’s Listening In Our Circumstances: Our circumstances surround us and many times overwhelm us. But are we really seeing our circumstances as they truly are? Melanie Hoover challenges us to take a deep breath, look again, and listen for a word of comfort and reassurance from Jesus.
  • New release! Dusk’s Warriors by Emerian Rich

    Evo
    7 Jul 2014 | 7:22 pm
    Here’s the second book in the Night’s Knights Vampire Series by Emerian Rich. If horror trips your trigger, check out Dusk’s Warriors<: In a heavenly word, rebuilt from the brink of destruction, a group of immortals with new found powers encounter an enemy who threatens to end them for good. Can a society of street thugs battle their demons for them, or are they going to need the help of someone stronger? You think you know everything about vampires? Think again. With voices by: Mark Eller, Rhonda Carpenter, Mike Bennett, MJ Hahn, H. E. Roulo, Arlene Radasky, Dan…
  • New release! On Liberty by John Stuart Mill

    Evo
    1 Jul 2014 | 7:38 pm
    David “Grizzly” Smith has a penchant for narrating the classics. This time, it’s On Liberty, published originally 145 years ago. “On Liberty,” a seminal work by philosopher John Stuart Mill.  Mill felt there were no definite standards for defining what society has standing to regulate and punish, and what is solely the business of individual to choose for themselves, if they accept the consequences to themselves.  It is a discussion that needs to be remembered, and it is a discussion that needs to be revived in the modern world.  Liberty still matters.
  • New release! Tincture, And The Devil Pulls Six-Guns by Matthew D. Jordan

    Evo
    30 Jun 2014 | 8:50 pm
    Woot! The second book is out! If you like your scifi on the post apocalyptic side, you’ll love Tincture, And The Devil Pulls Six-Guns: After the events in the Shimmer Town, Abranyah and her family are left with more responsibility than she believes they can handle – both in her time, as it is, and in the “other place.” As the rebuild continues, cryptic clues of a time before hers – a time before The Whatever – have started appearing in Abranyah’s life. Truly the only thing certain, in times as they are, is uncertainty. A mysterious figure known as…
  • New release! Astreya: Book 1. The Voyage South by Seymour Hamilton

    Evo
    29 Jun 2014 | 10:34 am
    Looking for a fantasy/scifi young adult mashup? Seymour has it with Astreya: Book 1. The Voyage South: When Astreya is 17, his widowed mother gives him his father’s knife, riddling notebook and bracelet.  Searching for the meaning of his strange inheritance he sails south into adventure:  he endures storm at sea, betrayal, slavery, night escapes, false accusations and knife fights, but with the help of loyal friends he also begins to find love and the chance to discover his destiny.
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    The Bookshop Blog

  • Meet 3 Seasoned Booksellers

    Carol Hoenig
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:22 am
    So who are these three women eager to bring a bookstore to Rockville Centre, which is on the South Shore of Long Island? Peggy, Dianne and Carol think it’s important to let their patrons know why they are the ones to bring Turn of the Corkscrew, Books & Wine to[Read More...] Author information Carol Hoenig Carol Hoenig, President of Carol Hoenig, Publishing Consultant, Inc. works with authors and publishers in a variety of ways, from first drafts to putting together book proposals to creating publicity and marketing campaigns. Prior to starting her business in 2005, Carol worked at…
  • Bringing A Bookstore to the South Shore of Long Island

    Carol Hoenig
    24 Jul 2014 | 5:52 am
      People tend to respond favorably when I tell them that my friend, who is also my new business partner, and I plan to open a bookstore on the South Shore of Long Island, but once I add that we will also be serving wine and beer their eyes light[Read More...] Author information Carol Hoenig Carol Hoenig, President of Carol Hoenig, Publishing Consultant, Inc. works with authors and publishers in a variety of ways, from first drafts to putting together book proposals to creating publicity and marketing campaigns. Prior to starting her business in 2005, Carol worked at Borders Group, Inc.
  • Join Us – Do You Own A Bookshop?

    Bruce K. Hollingdrake
    15 Jul 2014 | 8:22 am
    We are presently looking for 2 new Featured contributors. If you own or manage a small bookshop and would like to share some experiences/tips with our writers all while gaining a little exposure for your business – please consider joining The Bookshop Blog. We will expect the contributor to write[Read More...] Author information Bruce K. Hollingdrake The post Join Us – Do You Own A Bookshop? appeared first on The Bookshop Blog.
  • Alexandra Horowitz and Experiencing the Wonders Around Us?

    Bruce K. Hollingdrake
    9 Jul 2014 | 6:42 am
    From Brain Pickings… For my book club collaboration with The Dish, Andrew Sullivan’s online oasis of intelligence and idealism, I had the pleasure of sitting down with cognitive scientist Alexandra Horowitz to discuss her immeasurably wonderful On Looking: Eleven Walks with Expert Eyes — one of the best books of[Read More...] Author information Bruce K. Hollingdrake The post Alexandra Horowitz and Experiencing the Wonders Around Us? appeared first on The Bookshop Blog.
 
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    Berkeley Heights Public Library Book Blog

  • The Unchangeable Spots of Leopards

    Anne
    11 Jul 2014 | 9:40 am
    The library book group read Kristopher Jansma's The Unchangeable Spots of Leopards this month. The storyline simplified might be described as poor boy meets rich boy and his best rich gal pal and they all become best friends in their college years in a not-quite love triangle, but the friendship eventually breaks up and they all go their separate ways in soul-searching global journeys, only to meet again later, older and wiser. Or are they? Can leopards change their spots?But this book does not have a simple plot, in fact, this book is a book within a book within a novella as told by the…
  • Parnassus on Wheels

    Anne
    18 Jun 2014 | 12:13 pm
    "Oh, you're a librarian..," they say.Followed inevitably by,"You must read a lot."Or,"I'd like to read all day at my job..." wistfully."Ha ha, yes, so would I," is my not so clever rejoinder that is always ignored.How did I get to this librarian place? It might have been in seventh grade when Mrs. Quinn, my English teacher, assigned a 1917 book by Christopher Morley, Parnassus on Wheels, which begins: CHAPTER ONEI wonder if there isn't a lot of bunkum in higher education? I neverfound that people who were learned in logarithms and other kinds ofpoetry were any quicker in washing dishes…
  • Three Good Books: Happy, Romantic, and Quirky

    Fleur
    17 Jun 2014 | 4:31 pm
    During May and June at the library our patrons begin to ask about this year’s popular beach and vacation books, so we try to keep ahead of that demand. The local schools send us their summer reading assignments in early June so those titles need to be ordered and organized for the library before school lets out. Sometimes it is difficult to find something good to read in this transitional reading season when we are preoccupied with preparing for summer reading. This year, however, I have hit the reading Triple Crown of three good books in a row. In no particular order, they are:10% Happier:…
  • What if Book Reviews Were Written Like Wine Reviews?

    Anne
    9 Jun 2014 | 12:01 pm
    Have you ever wondered why wines are described with terms that are more puzzling than helpful, more poetic than realistic? A flyer for a local wine store sat on the table in the library staff room the other day, so of course, because librarians have to have something to read at all times and it was there, we read it. Aloud. The descriptions of wines are inventive, colorful, creative, even whacky. For example:"Brooding layers of black cherry, pulverized rock, spiced cedar and hints of anise roar with authority, while massive tannins and roaring acidity deliver a crushing blow of flavor that'll…
  • Something Funny for Summer Reading

    Anne
    30 May 2014 | 1:38 pm
    This is a reposting from last May. David Sedaris is funny enough to be recommended over and over :-)In 'Let's Explore Diabetes with Owls, Essays, Etc.' humorist and author David Sedaris offers his wry observations on the topics of living as an American ex-patriot in France and England, traveling the world on book tours and remembering his childhood in Raleigh, North Carolina. His fans will enjoy his quirky obsessions which teeter on the edge of creepy and gross, but then pull back into touching and humane at the last sentence or two. Standouts from this collection are: 'Dentists Without…
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    Joe Wikert's Digital Content Strategies

  • Unlimited subscriptions: Five things you need to know

    Joe Wikert
    21 Jul 2014 | 6:28 am
    One of the worst kept secrets in recent history was finally unveiled last Friday when Amazon announced their Kindle Unlimited program. It has the potential to become yet another terrific service for consumers but many publishers and authors are less... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Thriving as econtent prices fall

    Joe Wikert
    14 Jul 2014 | 7:06 am
    Last week I wrote about why I believe econtent prices will continue to drop in the future. The feedback I got in a couple of LinkedIn groups and via email was mixed. Some readers agreed and others seemed to think... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Why econtent prices will erode even further

    Joe Wikert
    7 Jul 2014 | 7:10 am
    If you think econtent prices are too low today, well, in the immortal words of Bachman Turner Overdrive, you ain’t seen nothing yet. In fact, “nothing” is precisely where more and more econtent prices are heading. Here are a few... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Is your content strategy optimized for Millennials?

    Joe Wikert
    30 Jun 2014 | 6:40 am
    Unless your organization is a startup it’s highly likely you’re using a strategy and business model that’s worked for many years. That same strategy and business model might span multiple generations. Even though you’ve embraced the latest technologies and devices,... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Why Amazon Firefly is important

    Joe Wikert
    23 Jun 2014 | 6:08 am
    At any given point in time it’s easy to assume that search engines have evolved as much as they’re ever going to. Sometimes it’s hard to avoid falling into the logic that was allegedly uttered long ago by Charles Duell:... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    First Book Blog

  • How Kansas City Kids Beat Summer Slide

    Julia Hornaday
    25 Jul 2014 | 8:27 am
    All summer long, you’ve heard how summer slide – the learning loss that occurs when kids are out of school – adds up for kids who don’t have access to books and other learning opportunities. But there’s good news – many schools and organizations throughout the country are working hard to stop summer slide. Take Kansas City, Missouri, for example. Over the last two summers, a coalition of KC-based organizations have been working with First Book to help reverse summer learning loss for kids in their community. “More needs to be done to address the summer…
  • Out-of-This-World Books!

    Marissa Wasseluk
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:55 am
    The Apollo XI moon landing celebrated its 45th anniversary this past Sunday. First Book is celebrating this momentous event with some of our favorite space-inspired books:  1. Almost Astronauts: Thirteen Women Who Dared to Dream What does it take to be an astronaut? Excellence at flying, courage, intelligence, resistance to stress, top physical shape–any checklist would include these. But when America created NASA in 1958, there was another unspoken rule: you had to be a man. Here is the tale of thirteen women who proved that they were not only as tough as the toughest man but also…
  • The Joy of Giving Back

    Marissa Wasseluk
    21 Jul 2014 | 1:14 pm
    They each shared their reasons for being there – cherished memories of reading with a parent, the desire to instill a love of reading in their own kids, wanting to honor a father’s passion for education. It was the first task Joy Brooke, co-chair of First Book’s Seattle volunteer chapter, asked her members to complete. “Everyone had a story that led them to First Book. And everyone believed in the simple goal of getting books to kids,” said Joy. Joy herself was drawn to the idea of helping put new books into the homes of low-income families. As a teacher and a mother of two who is…
  • No Kid Hungry: Summer Feeding and Summer Fun

    Samantha McGinnis
    18 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    For kids from low-income families, summer doesn’t always mean carefree fun. Many kids have fewer learning opportunities and parents often struggle to find safe, affordable childcare, making summer a time of stress and worry. For more than 21 million kids who rely on free and reduced price meals during the school year, summer is also a time of hunger. Forty three percent of families that rely on school meal programs find themselves without enough food when school is out. First Book knows kids need to be nourished in body and mind, during the summer and all year-round. That’s why First Book…
  • Summer Slide: It Adds Up

    Samantha McGinnis
    16 Jul 2014 | 3:12 pm
    Now in the thick of hot and sticky summer, the ring of the school bell has long left kids’ minds. And while three months may not seem like much, that time really adds up for kids who don’t have access to books or educational activities. Summer slide sets in, and without access to summer learning resources, kids fall behind. A study of students in Baltimore, MD showed that kids without access to books over the summer were behind their peers during the next school year. And as years passed, the effect accumulated.  By the end of 5th grade, kids in need were nearly three years…
 
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    Publishing Talk

  • Backdoor Routes to Getting a Literary Agent

    Kirsty McLachlan
    24 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    This article first appeared in issue 1 of Publishing Talk Magazine. An extract first appeared on this website on 26 Sept 2012. Kirsty McLachlan of DGA Ltd answers one of your most commonly-asked questions: “How do I get an agent?” She reveals ways to get noticed – and avoid languishing in the slush pile. Let me shatter an almost universally held belief straight away: not all writers find their agents via the slush pile. Many take another route altogether. If I could present you with a pie chart of ‘ways to find an agent’, the slush pile would be a small sliver of that cake. Slush…
  • From Fantasy to Reality – How Ben Galley became a Successful Self-Publishing Authorpreneur

    Jon Reed
    1 Jul 2014 | 11:38 pm
    This article first appeared in issue 5 of Publishing Talk Magazine. Ben Galley reveals how he self-published his way to become a successful ‘authorpreneur’ at the age of 26. Ben Galley is a young self-published author of the epic and gritty fantasy series The Emaneska Series. He has published four books to date, and doesn’t intend to stop any time soon. Zealous about inspiring other authors and writers, Ben also runs the popular advice site Shelf Help, where he offers advice about writing, publishing, and marketing; and is the co-founder and director of ebook store Libiro, a…
  • 10 Ways to Win with WordPress

    Jon Reed
    27 Jun 2014 | 12:08 pm
    This article first appeared in issue 1 of Publishing Talk Magazine. Want to start a book blog? Get up and running in minutes with WordPress. WordPress is the blogging software I always recommend. It is flexible, extendible, easy to use – and free. But there is more to it than writing a personal online journal. You can use it to build a website, promote your books – and build a community. Here are 10 ways to make the most of it: Create a website. Don’t want to start blogging yet? You still need a website, even if it is a simple one-page site with your contact details. WordPress is the…
  • Don’t Panic! 6 science fiction themes that illustrate a positive future for publishing

    Alastair Horne
    16 May 2014 | 12:36 pm
    This article first appeared in issue 5 of Publishing Talk Magazine. While some publishers view digital as a dystopian nightmare, Alastair Horne considers six science fiction themes and how they illustrate a more positive future for the industry. Something not-quite-so wicked this way comes Dystopian fiction has provided the publishing industry with some of its biggest recent successes – Suzanne Collins’s Hunger Games trilogy is reported to have sold more than 50 million copies in the past five years. The vision of a dystopian future that has had the greatest influence over publishing in…
  • Bologna Children’s Book Fair round-up 2014

    Lucy Coats
    3 Apr 2014 | 9:53 am
    Were you at the Bologna Children’s Book Fair this year? Don’t worry if not – our intrepid reporter Lucy Coats has all the inside scoop for you. Some called it the ‘Quietly Confident Fair’, some the ‘Smiley Fair’ – and one literary scout called it the ‘Fair of the Partial Submission’. There were no empty stands – and the Halls were buzzing. So what really made the 51st Bologna Children’s Book Fair tick? What was hot (and what was not)? Pre-Fair, The Bookseller was keen to talk about the ‘staunch’ nature of the…
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    University of Nebraska Press

  • From the desk of Dawn G. Marsh

    nebraskapress
    23 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    Below author Dawn G. Marsh writes about the genesis of her book, A Lenape among the Quakers (UNP, March 2014), in graduate school. My book, A Lenape among the Quakers: The Life of Hannah Freeman, emerged from the pages of a dissertation completed to fulfill the requirements for a doctoral degree in history. The path to that dissertation topic was not out of the ordinary. But the space between the dissertation and the final manuscript is as convoluted as the course of the Brandywine River, the center of Hannah Freeman’s world. My interest in Pennsylvania’s Indian history was both…
  • The Marketeers Club: Reading is fundamental—but struggling to become a priority

    nebraskapress
    11 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    Tish Fobben is the direct response manager at the University of Nebraska Press.  A recent Shelf Awareness newsletter headline caught my eye, “RIF Survey: Reading Important, but Not a Top Summer Priority.” Shelf Awareness reported “a new survey commissioned by Reading is Fundamental and Macy’s found that 17% of parents believe reading is a top summer priority and that children spend nearly three times the hours playing video games or watching TV than reading during summer vacation. . . . While summer reading may not be the top priority, 83% of respondents still considered it…
  • From the desk of Kate Buford: What's in a Name?

    nebraskapress
    10 Jul 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Kate Buford is the author of Native American Son: The Life and Sporting Legend of Jim Thorpe.  We know the legal facts by now. On Wednesday, June 18, the U.S. Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, part of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, cancelled six different trademark protections associated with the Washington Redskins professional football team. Federal trademark law does not permit registration of trademarks that “may disparage” individuals or groups or “bring them into contempt or disrepute.” Each of the trademarks in question contained the word “redskin.” The 2–1…
  • Backgrounding the Outward Odyssey Series

    nebraskapress
    7 Jul 2014 | 8:15 am
    This op-ed originally appeared on Spaceflight Insider. Colin Burgess is the editor for the Outward Odyssey Series. During a recent interview, I was asked where ideas for new books originate. I replied that they usually come quite unexpectedly and often are derived from casual conversations or notions that people suggest. The important thing is to recognize these verbal prompts when they appear, and then act on them. However, the entire concept of the Outward Odyssey series was not mine to begin with, and on this occasion the idea came from a more traditional source. It all started with a…
  • From the desk of Tim Grove: American history myths

    nebraskapress
    4 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    Think you know American history? You may be wrong. History myths, as told in A Grizzly in the Mail and Other Adventures in American History:  1) Betsy Ross sewed the first flag. She sits with the Founding Fathers on the Fourth of July parade float, in colonial costume, a mobcap on her head and a thirteen-star American flag draped over her knee. Most American children know her by name: Betsy Ross, the woman who sewed America’s first stars and stripes. But  historians have found no definitive documentary evidence to support the story that Betsy sewed the first flag at the request of…
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    800 CEO Read

  • Friday Links

    Ryan Schleicher
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:42 pm
    Tweet➻ Ted Coiné is on a mission to perpetuate the idea that ethical leadership practices will lead companies to the promise land. In a piece on Switch & Shift titled “Leadership Ethics: It doesn’t depend”, Coiné writes that Ethics today save you money tomorrow. But that’s not all. Ethics today makes you more money, every day of the year, for generations. Because your workers at all levels care, and so they pitch in with zest to make your company great. They think about improving your firm all week long, and they bring those off-hour innovations to work. They bring you their…
  • ChangeThis: Issue 119

    dylan
    23 Jul 2014 | 12:30 pm
    Tweet The Most Important Company In the World: Intel, Moore’s Law, and the Heartbeat of Civilization by Michael S. Malone “We now live differently, learn differently, communicate differently, an ultimately, think differently. … We have internalized Moore’s Law. Its beat is now our heartbeat; its pace of change is now the heartbeat of civilization.” The Road (to Reinvention) Is Calling by Josh Linkner “Companies, communities, and individuals fall for many reasons, but one of the most common—and easily avoidable—is the failure to reinvent. Those who feel the most secure in the…
  • How Not To Be Wrong

    Michael
    17 Jul 2014 | 12:33 pm
    TweetI must preface this review by letting you know that I am not the kind of person inclined to read a book about mathematics. I have very little background in math—if I remember correctly, my undergraduate education required two courses. Despite my typically non-mathematical disposition, How Not To Be Wrong called to me from the shelf. “When am I going to use this?” This is the quintessential complaint-cum-question from elementary school students the world over. It is also the introduction to Jordan Ellenberg’s new book dedicated to explaining exactly when and how we can and do use…
  • Jack Covert Selects – The Intel Trinity

    dylan
    11 Jul 2014 | 10:59 am
    Tweet The Intel Trinity: How Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and Andy Grove Built the World’s Most Important Company by Michael S. Malone, Harper Business, 560 page, $34.99, Hardcover, July 2014, ISBN 9780062226761 The Mark Zuckerbergs and Steve Jobs of the world have received an enormous share of the past decade’s business and cultural limelight, and with good reason: they, along with a growing number of Silicon Valley tech innovators, have altered how we as individuals exist within a larger cultural context, how we gather and digest information, and how we interact with one another. Often…
  • Jack Covert Selects – How the World Sees You

    dylan
    11 Jul 2014 | 10:55 am
    Tweet How the World Sees You: Discover Your Highest Value Through the Science of Fascination by Sally Hogshead, HarperBusiness, 428 pages, $29.99, Hardcover, ISBN 9780062230690, July 2014 The massive amount of research that went into Sally Hogshead’s new book, How the World Sees You, is staggering. For the past decade, she’s been scouring books and source materials, conducting polls and surveys with hundreds of thousands of people, and working with teams in the real world social labs of companies like AT&T, General Electric, and Cisco to discover how fascination works in both the…
 
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    Duffbert's Random Musings

  • Book Review - The Girl in 6E by A. R. Torre

    Thomas 'Duffbert' Duff
    25 Jul 2014 | 2:47 pm
    I just finished The Girl in 6E by A. R. Torre, and it turned into one of those "can't put it down" reads. It's a very dark and twisted story, and one that won't be comfortable for a number of readers. But it drew me in quickly, slowly revealing the plot as it went along... The main character (Jessica Manchild - formerly Deanna Martin) is a single woman living on her own in a run-down apartment, one that she never leaves... never. She has everything delivered to her via mail-order, and all the deliveries are left outside her door. She does this to protect others from some very dark…
  • Book Review - Field of Prey by John Sandford

    Thomas 'Duffbert' Duff
    15 Jul 2014 | 5:17 am
    I burned out a bit (a lot?) on the John Sandford Prey series a while back. The stories started to lack that "something" that kept me looking forward to the next one. I recently picked up Field of Prey to see if Lucas Davenport and company had regained their mojo, and I was pleasantly surprised. Field of Prey started off strong and kept up the pace right up to the finish. Davenport's back to a more hands-on crime-solving approach in this novel. He's called into a serial killer case that is rather gruesome. Two kids fooling around in a field ran across a buried cistern, but it wasn't…
  • Book Review - Rogue Code by Mark Russinovich

    Thomas 'Duffbert' Duff
    8 Jul 2014 | 4:24 am
    I really like how how Mark Russinovich mixes computer technology and spy/techno/action thriller material together in his novels. His latest, Rogue Code, continues his string of great reads, especially for those of us who are computer geeks. Russinovich takes on a hot topic currently in the news... high-frequency trading in the stock market. He uses it to build a story based on his main character, cyber-security expert Jeff Aiken. Aiken and his partner are called in to do a penetration test on the trading engine of the New York Stock Exchange. Starting from a normal level of access, they…
  • Book Review - Mr. Mercedes by Stephen King

    Thomas 'Duffbert' Duff
    3 Jul 2014 | 1:53 pm
    The last few Stephen King novels I've read have been very good, and Mr. Mercedes is no different. It starts off with a mass killing event by a deranged individual, and the suspense and action doesn't slow down. I normally associate King with paranormal stories, but he doesn't even approach that genre here. But the change in material doesn't make a bit of difference in turning out a story that I only put down when I couldn't keep my eyes open any longer. The basic story line revolves around a retired police detective, Bill Hodges. Life hasn't been overly kind to him since he's left the force,…
  • Book Review - The Decline and Fall of IBM: End Of An American Icon? by Robert X. Cringley

    Thomas 'Duffbert' Duff
    28 Jun 2014 | 10:51 am
    I'm a tech professional who specialized in IBM/Lotus software from 1996 through about 2012. I've read Robert Cringely's I, Cringely columns over the years, and watched how he documented the decline of IBM as a company where employees were respected and organizations received value for their money. The Decline and Fall of IBM: End of an American Icon? is Cringely's effort to take all his columns over time and present the material in a cohesive and comprehensive manner. With very few exceptions, I have to agree that his assessment is dead on (based on my observations and interactions with…
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    Three Percent - Article

  • Latest Review: "Astragal" by Albertine Sarrazin

    Kaija Straumanis
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:30 am
    The latest addition to our Reviews section is by Tiffany Nichols on Astragal by Albertine Sarrazin, translated by Patsy Southgate, published by New Directions. There’s some kind of summer flu-plague bug going around at the office here, so we’re short on humor and personal anecdotes. Also, Rochester is a city of downpours and flash flooding and even road-caving today, so it’s a great day to cut all pretense and just read about reading books. Here’s the beginning of Tiffany’s review: Upon completing Albertine Sarrazin’s Astragal I was left to wonder why it ever…
  • Latest Review: "Live Bait" by Fabio Genovesi

    Kaija Straumanis
    25 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    The latest addition to our Reviews section is by Megan Berkobien on Live Bait by Fabio Genovesi, translated by Michael Moore and out from Other Press. Meg is a PhD student in Comparative Literature at the University of Michigan, a writer, and a translator from Spanish. Her translations have appeared on Words without Borders and Asymptote, among others, and her translation of Christina Peri Rossi’s Strange Flying Objects is forthcoming February 2015 from Ox and Pigeon. You can also read samples of her work at her website here. Here’s the beginning of Meg’s review: When my…
  • July Newsletter (With Special Subscription Offer!)

    Chad W. Post
    25 Jul 2014 | 7:07 am
    If you don’t already subscribe to our (sporadic, but in good times, bi-weekly) newsletter, you can do so by clicking here. And if you missed the one that went out earlier this week, you can see the prettified version here, or just read it all below. The Last Days of My Mother “Pick of the Week” in Publishers Weekly In almost every issue of Publishers Weekly—the trade magazine for booksellers, publishers, agents, and authors—the editors select one title to promote as the “Pick of the Week.” It’s usually something predictably large and respectable (like the new David…
  • Gulf Coast Prize in Translation

    Chad W. Post
    22 Jul 2014 | 7:36 am
    Just found out that _Gulf Coast Magazine is launching a new translation prize—one that might interest some of you: Gulf Coast is now accepting entries for the inaugural Gulf Coast Translation Prize. In 2014, the contest is open to poetry in translation. The winner receives $1,000 and publication in the journal. Two honorable mentions will also appear in issue 27.2, due out in April 2015. All entries will be considered for paid publication on our website as Online Exclusives. This year’s contest will be judged by Jen Hofer. A Los Angeles-based poet, translator, social justice…
  • Translation, A Reciprocal Process [Interview with Kareem James Abu-Zeid on "Nothing More to Lose" by Najwan Darwish]

    Kaija Straumanis
    21 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    It’s always interesting to read a translator’s commentary on his or her translation process. For me personally, hearing how other translators think and work only adds to my personal work and experience, alternately showing me approaches or tactics that don’t work for me and showing me approaches and tactics that I’m not alone in using or obsessing over. The below interview between Liz Kelley and translator Kareem James Abu-Zeid came to us in lieu of a review, as Liz and Kareem are friends as well as colleagues in the world of Arabic literature. I won’t write too…
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    HBR.org

  • The Cardinal Sins of Innovation Policy

    Dan Breznitz
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    It happens every time there’s a big announcement about a national or regional innovation policy that will lead us into the future: We are presented with schemes to strengthen intellectual property rights, enlarge the pool of risk financing, and upgrade the universities while pushing them to collaborate more with industry. If we are truly lucky, we are told about a new science park to be built just around the corner. There is only one question that is never asked or answered: Why? Why should a specific place — a region, a city, or even a country — want to have an innovation policy? This…
  • Promoting the Non-Obvious Candidate

    Raghu Krishnamoorthy
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    Conventional talent-management systems emphasize the need to give high performers appropriate experiences to help them ascend to more senior levels of management. Companies define career paths accordingly and carefully map, often in a linear fashion, the various roles one has to fill to reach higher management ranks. However, in addition to grooming obvious high performers who are accomplished in a particular domain, talent-management systems should also deliberately look at non-obvious candidates. They are high performers in other domains who do not automatically fit the bill. This may be…
  • Why No One Gets Away with Trash Talk Anymore

    Nathan Bennett
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    This summer, a milestone crept up on me—I realized it’s been twenty-five years since I began my career as a professor.  So naturally, I’ve spent some time reflecting on how my choice of profession has worked out.  I spend most of my classroom time with executives who are there because they are unhappy with where they are – or they at least understand they won’t be satisfied for long.  Their hope is that whatever we do together in class will help them find something they’ll find more fulfilling.  How thankful I am that I’ve never had to wrestle with that. And how grateful I…
  • 5 Things Digital CMOs Do Better

    Jake Sorofman
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    If you’re a mid- or late-career marketer, chances are your job today is mostly unrecognizable from what you signed on for. Perhaps no other business function has changed as dramatically over the past decade. Why? Following a silent coup, the coronation is complete: the customer is king. With an abundance of information and choice, customers now guide their own self-directed decision journey as they traverse connected experiences that blur the lines between physical and virtual and scramble marketers’ signals for targeting. Many marketers are left behind, simply tuned in to the wrong…
  • Why It’s Fair to Save a Parking Spot – For a Price

    Gretchen Gavett
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Tech start-up Haystack has developed an innovative – and controversial — solution to the stressful challenge of finding an open parking meter in congested areas. This smartphone app allows those leaving a parking space to alert other Haystack users in the area of their “about-to-be” open spot. To secure this meter (i.e., have the parked car driver wait until they arrive), users pay a fee of $3 (75 cents goes to Haystack while the incumbent “parker” pockets $2.25). Not surprisingly, Haystack has stirred up controversy amongst city officials, particularly in Boston, as well as…
 
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    Books on the Nightstand

  • BOTNS #290: Listeners Weigh In

    Ann Kingman
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:09 pm
    A race for the Bingo!, Listeners call in about episode #286, Amy Bloom’s new novel, and a book on helping your kids stay organized. Michael and I appear to be in a race to the BINGO! though neither of us will achieve it any time soon. We’ve loved seeing your BINGO reports on our Goodreads group, and I’ve added a bunch of books to my to read list from that thread. There’s still time to participate in our Summer Reading Bingo! Click here to get your personalized BOTNS Bingo card – just be sure to hit refresh once or twice after you click the link. Audiobook of…
  • BOTNS #289: Blurbs and a Modern First Library

    Michael Kindness
    15 Jul 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Can you trust author blurbs on books? A first library for children. We recommend The Girls from Corona del Mar by Rufi Thorpe and My Pet Book by Bob Staake.   A Bit About Blurbs Alexa from Illinois asks about quotes from authors that are featured on books. Are the authors that provide the blurb paid for it, friends with the author? Are those quotes genuine? There are exceptions to every rule, but authors are not paid to blurb books, but there is often a connection between the book or author and the blurbing author: they may be friends, they may share an editor or an agent who shares the…
  • BOTNS #288: Bad news and good news

    Ann Kingman
    8 Jul 2014 | 7:42 pm
    We follow up some sad literary news with some great book news; we recommend My Accidental Jihad and Close Your Eyes, Hold Hands.    First, the bad news   We are saddened by the report that author Colum McCann was assaulted while trying to help someone during a domestic situation in New Haven, CT. Our best wishes for a speedy recovery. We also mourn two amazing people who passed away last week: author and ambassador for Young People’s literature Walter Dean Myers and Louis Zamperini, subject of Laura Hillenbrand’s Unbroken. Lastly, we mourn the end of World Book Night…
  • BOTNS #287: Separating the Author from their Work

    Michael Kindness
    1 Jul 2014 | 6:00 pm
    New literary holidays. Separating the author from their work. And we recommend Byrd by Kim Church and The Fever by Megan Abbott.  Happy Tom Sawyer Days! Ann and I are making progress on our BOTNS Bingo cards. I’m reading books then seeing if they can count for any squares. Ann is letting the Bingo card guide her reading. If you haven’t printed your card out yet, check out our original post for instructions, and the link to get your own card. Don’t forget to call our voicemail line (209.867.7323) and share your views about the discussion we had in episode 286 about…
  • BOTNS #286: Read whatever you want

    Ann Kingman
    24 Jun 2014 | 5:15 pm
    A rant on on people who think they know what you should and shouldn’t read; CallMeIshmael; The Quick and The Painter   Call Ishmael. Really. We just learned about a very cool site, CallMeIshmael, that we love. It’s a site where you can call and leave a short voicemail that tells a story about a book. The site is video, but also works as audio, and we’ve gotten permission to play one of the voicemails on this episode. But if you’re reading the show notes, do check out the site itself to get the full (very cool) experience. The entry we played on the podcast is The…
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    Omnivoracious

  • The Enduring Hunt for Nazi War Criminals

    Neal Thompson
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:25 pm
    Next year marks the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II, yet the search for Nazi perpetrators continues--as does the publication of books about Nazi hunting, even as the last of them die out. On Wednesday, an 89-year-old Philadelphia man died just hours before a judge ordered his extradition to Germany for his role in the gassing of 216,000 Jews at Auschwitz. Johann Breyer, who served as an armed guard at the notorious concentration camp, was accused of being an accessory to murder, in what will likely be one of the last Nazi cases on American soil. Nicholas Kulish's recent…
  • The Men (and Women) Who Knew Too Much: History's Most Notorious Spies

    Jon Foro
    25 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    Nobody knows spies like Ben Macintyre. With Double CrossAgent Zigzag, and Operation Mincemeat, the London-based author established himself as the master chronicler of spooks and subterfuge, a biographer of the most eccentric personalities ever to dwell in the shadows of diplomacy. (Macintyre is also a regular dweller of our Best of the Month lists.) His latest, A Spy Among Friends, tackles the story of the man who may have been the most damaging double-agent in history: Kim Philby, Britain's top spy-hunter charged with catching Soviet moles, who all the while spilled deadly secrets to…
  • American Spymaster

    Jon Foro
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    Meet Jack Devine. Something of a real-life George Smiley, he is a 30-year veteran of the CIA who, among a lot of things, ran Charlie Wilson's war against the Soviets in Afghanistan, knew a thing or two about the Iran-Contra affair long before the rest of us did (including the president?), and tangled with some of the agency's most notorious double-agents. In Good Hunting: An American Spymaster’s Story, Devine has written a fascinating memoir of his time overseeing the agency’s spying operations, while also critiquing its policies and direction--arguing that covert ops (i.e.
  • YA Wednesday: Rainbow Rowell on "Landline," the 90s, and Disney theme parks

    Seira Wilson
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:22 am
    It's no secret that I'm a huge fan of Rainbow Rowell and when I met her in person a month ago, it only confirmed my suspicion that she's as fabulous in person as the books she writes.  Her latest, Landline, is classified as an adult book, but like her YA titles, there is no set age required for entry.   Landline tells the story of a marriage floundering in the wake of career, kids, and the daily grind.  Rowell uses a trick of time to allow her main character, Georgie, to revisit how she and husband Neal found each other and the final hurdle that resulted in a…
  • Horses of the Apocalypse: Scott Cheshire's American Epic

    Kevin Nguyen
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    A blurb from Philipp Meyer hails Scott Cheshire's debut novel, High as the Horses' Bridles, as "a great new American epic." At first glance, the page count of Bridles seems too slim to be an epic. But within its swift 300 pages, Cheshire's thematic scope is cast wide, capturing a number of deeply intertwined American ideas. In many ways, the book is a lens into the expanse of American faith and how unshakable it is, even when that relationship is conflicted. From its opening pages, Bridles is heavily doused in apocalyptic language. Twelve-year-old Josiah Laudermilk delivers a doomsday…
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    GalleyCat

  • Scholastic to Shutter Storia

    Dianna Dilworth
    28 Jul 2014 | 11:20 am
    Scholastic is closing its children’s book platform app Storia in favor of pushing its subscription model reading platform Storia School Edition. “With the launch of Storia School Edition on September 1, Scholastic will transition to a streaming model for children’s eBook delivery,” the publisher explained on its website. “The switch to streaming means that eBooks you’ve previously purchased may soon no longer be accessible.You may be able to continue using your eBooks by making sure to open them on a bookshelf at least once by October 15.” Readers that…
  • Cocktails For Book Lovers

    Dianna Dilworth
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:30 am
    Do you like to drink while you are reading? BookGirl.TV host Tessa Smith-McGovern has authored a cookbook to help you figure out which drinks to pair with which authors. Cocktails for Book Lovers, out this month from Sourcebooks, includes 50 recipes for cocktails inspired by different authors. Check it out: From Jane Austen’s little-known fondness for wine to Hemingway’s beloved mojitos, literature and libations go hand in hand. Cocktails for Book Lovers blends these in a delectable book that will delight both readers and cocktail enthusiasts alike. This irresistible collection features…
  • Marvel Reveals Trailer For Contest of Champions Video Game

    Dianna Dilworth
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:50 am
    Marvel has a new video game for smartphones and tablets called Contest of Champions coming out this fall. The comic book publisher revealed the upcoming game over the weekend at San Diego Comic Con. The game features many Marvel Comics heroes. The publisher shared a trailer for the game over the weekend, which we have embedded above for you to explore. Here is more from the Facebook page: “We’re very excited to announce Marvel Contest of Champions! Here’s a preview of what’s to come! Check back often for sneak previews, behind the scenes info and more!” New…
  • Free Samples of 2014 Eisner Award Winning Comics

    Maryann Yin
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    The winners of the 2014 Will Eisner Comic Industry Awards have been announced. Follow the links below for free samples of books by some of the winners. Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples won the prize for “Best Continuing Series” for Saga. Vivek J. Tiwary, Andrew C. Robinson, and Kyle Baker came out on top in the “Best Reality-Based Work” category for The Fifth Beatle. Matthew Inman took home the “Best Digital Comic” award for The Oatmeal. Here’s more from the press release: “Named for acclaimed comics creator the Will Eisner, the awards are…
  • Teaser Trailer Out For ‘Mockingjay’ Part 1

    Maryann Yin
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:25 am
    Lionsgate has unleashed a teaser for Mockingjay Part 1. The video embedded above offers glimpses of former head gamemaker Plutarch Heavensbee, District 13 leader Alma Coin, and the reluctant rebel Katniss Everdeen. Prior to the unveiling of this trailer, the movie studio released two “Panem Address” videos with victors Peeta Mallark and Johanna Mason standing beside the evil President Snow. This film adaptation will hit theaters on November 21, 2014. (via Vanity Fair) New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.
 
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    Storytellers Unplugged

  • FORENSICS 179: WHAT IS THAT ODOR?

    Robert Jones
    19 Jul 2014 | 6:28 am
    This essay might be of special interest to writers of detective and mystery novels who would like to enrich their stories by providing their readers with a gift of extra details. It might also be of general interest to many other readers, especially those who are CSI and NCIS fans. Kindly note that the characters and locations in the following essay are fictitious and have been created to represent persons and places associated with a possible crime solved with the aid of an unusual, but real, forensic method. The telephone call was directed to the office of Captain Billy Miller, who was in…
  • Thomas Sullivan: TWEETING A NOVEL or FICKLE FIREFLIES at MIDNIGHT

    Thomas Sullivan
    15 Jul 2014 | 6:29 am
    Tweets are for Twits. …and also for visionaries, sages and gods on the verge of creation – i.e. writers in the throes of inspiration. That’s because simple one-sentence summaries are essential for clarity of thought. They are like single seeds full of promise, whereas unpruned gardens can easily bloom into tangles. Getting bloomers down to briefs is…um, as basic as underwear. So, a tweet-size summary will sharpen and consolidate your wits. And if brevity is the soul of wit, it can also be the thumbprint of a character, the skeleton of a sketch, the pulse of a short story, and even…
  • The art of time travel

    Alma Alexander
    30 Jun 2014 | 8:03 am
    I time travel quite a bit. No, seriously, I do. It’s cheap and you can do it whenever you want, really. So long as you have photographs.. Sometimes, when I take stock of how many photographs I have, it’s alarming. There are albums and albums which my father put together as I was growing up. The earliest one I have in my closet, a precious thing, is the old fashioned kind with thick gray pages on which you pasted the photos, and Dad did this, small old black and white pics to begin with, of my mother pregnant with me and then my first baby pictures (yes the obligatory bare-ass one…) and…
  • FORENSICS 178: SOLUTIONS COURTESY OF LIBS

    Robert Jones
    19 Jun 2014 | 5:57 am
    This essay might be of special interest to writers of detective and mystery novels who would like to enrich their stories by providing their readers with a gift of extra details. It might also be of general interest to many other readers, especially those who are CSI and NCIS fans. ****** Although the outcome of some criminal cases are decided by one crucial piece of evidence. many are based upon a combination of supporting pieces of evidence. Such a case was one involving a murder in Texas. A major factor was provided by a friend of the murderer to whom the latter had confessed. Supporting…
  • Thomas Sullivan: STAYING NEW IN THE CLOSET

    Thomas Sullivan
    15 Jun 2014 | 5:17 am
    The larder is full, and so I’m happy to take on some of these questions you’ve so thoughtfully provided over the past several months. As a writer, whatever informs me about people, informs my craft. If it deals with human nature (which is what writing is about), creativity, author questions, or personal interest, I’ll consider it in the mix. When readers take the trouble (and sometimes the hurt) to share, I want that reflected in this column. And whether I include your question or not, please never doubt that I’m extremely grateful for the communication. Q [Los Angeles, CA]: Are you…
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    Paulo Coelho's Blog

  • Vacations

    Paulo Coelho
    27 Jul 2014 | 6:16 pm
    Begona Miguel of the Huelgas Monastery says: “San Juan de La Cruz teaches us that silence has its own music; it is silence that enables us to see ourselves and the things around us. “I would like to add that there are words that can only be said in silence, odd as that may seem. […]
  • 10 SEC READ: Angels talk

    Paulo Coelho
    25 Jul 2014 | 2:10 pm
    Conversation in heaven Abd Mubarak was on his way to Mecca when one night he dreamed that he was in heaven and heard two angels having a conversation. “How many pilgrims came to the holy city this year?” one of them asked. “Six hundred thousand”, answered the other. “And how many of them had their […]
  • The day I turned 60

    Paulo Coelho
    22 Jul 2014 | 5:48 pm
    At 23:15 on the 23rd of August I went to Lourdes so that at exactly 00:05 of the 24th, the moment I was born, I could be at the grotto of Our Lady to thank her for my life up to that moment and ask her to protect me from that moment on. It was […]
  • Paulo Coelho Discusses the 25th Anniversary Edition of The Alchemist

    Paulo Coelho
    20 Jul 2014 | 5:21 pm
    What originally inspired you to write The Alchemist? Coelho: My dream was to be a writer. I wrote my first book in 1987, The Pilgrimage, after completing my own personal pilgrimage from France to Santiago de Compostela, Spain. After that I thought, “Why did it take me so long to fulfill my dream?” So I […]
  • The pilgrim in Cascais

    Paulo Coelho
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:23 pm
    Reação de Paulo Coelho ao assistir a sua cinebiografia OPENING IN BRASIL: Aug 16 WORLD WIDE: 2015
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    Advanced Fiction Writing

  • Want to Take a Thrill Ride With Me?

    Randy Ingermanson
    24 Jul 2014 | 1:00 am
    Do you like thrillers? I love them. Thrillers are the main category I read, and suspense is a major element of every book I write. My suspense novel Double Vision has just been packaged up in a HUGE boxed set e-book with 7 other thrillers. The boxed set is titled “Thrill Ride” and it’s priced to fly. 99 cents for THOUSANDS of pages of oh-my-gosh white-knuckle entertainment. If you’re a scaredy cat, this is where you stop reading and just walk away. But if you like thrills and chills, come along with me on a rip-roaring Thrill Ride, because it’s pretty darn likely that several of…
  • My New Book on the Snowflake Method

    Randy Ingermanson
    21 Jul 2014 | 5:05 pm
    Why are so many writers around the world using my Snowflake Method to write their first drafts? Because it works! Let’s be clear that different writers are different. Some writers thrive on the “seat-of-the-pants” method. Stephen King is a pantser. So is Anne Lamott.  They write great fiction and SOTP works for them. Some writers work from a highly detailed outline—a synopsis that may be 50 to 100 pages. Robert Ludlum was famous for his long outlines.  He was a great writer and outlining worked marvelously for him. But some writers love the Snowflake Method—a series of steps in…
  • The Death of “Self-Publishing”

    Randy Ingermanson
    22 May 2014 | 2:19 pm
    It’s time to just say it. “Self-publishing” is dead. I’m not talking about the act of self-publishing a book. I’m talking about the phrase itself. “Self-publishing” now means two different things that are miles apart. It’s time to kill this useless phrase. Barbara posted this question on my “Ask A Question For My Blog” page: I am confused by all the different terms in current publishing. Like “indie publishers,” “traditional publishers,” “ebooks,” “ebook indie publications,” “small presses” “small…
  • The Unsafe Road to Writing Fiction

    Randy Ingermanson
    15 May 2014 | 2:27 pm
    So you’re writing a story and you know it’s a heartbreaking work of staggering genius, except that … it isn’t. In fact, it’s bad. But the reason it’s bad is NOT that you’re a bad writer. The reason it’s bad is because you’re using a technique that’s not familiar to you. What do you do? Hamish posted this question on my “Ask A Question For My Blog” page: Hello! Ben reading your blog for around two years now, it has helped me greatly, thank you! My question is this: I love first person, I despise third person. I love the knowledge of a single character, knowing…
  • The Official Rules on Head-Hopping

    Randy Ingermanson
    30 Apr 2014 | 12:22 pm
    So you’re writing a novel and it’s a Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, but somebody told you head-hopping is a no-no, and now you’re worried because you like head-hopping. What’s the deal? Agata posted this question on my “Ask A Question For My Blog” page: Hi Randy, I’ve been reading your blog and it’s amazing. I’m planning/writing a novel and your posts are incredibly helpful in organizing everything. I’m writing here because I have a dilemma about the POV characters. I have two POV characters, sometimes they have their own scenes and…
 
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    Joanna Campbell Slan

  • How to Make a Hummingbird Feeder -- Miniature Tutorial (1:12 scale)

    2 Jul 2014 | 12:32 pm
    I love using things that would normally hit the trash can. This project reminds me to look at familiar objects with fresh insight. For years I've tossed away the lids to the McDonald's beverages. I was amazed when I looked carefully and noticed the raised icons. I can't wait to see what I can do next with the other emblems!SUPPLIES:Red nail polish or acrylic paintYellow nail polish or acrylic paintRed paperLength of green floral wire (six inches)ScissorsA needle or something to poke a small hole withCircle punch (preferably the same diameter as the strawTacky Quick Drying glueClear drinking…
  • These Are a Few of My Favorite Things

    30 Jun 2014 | 3:44 am
    I've been re-reading Elizabeth Gilbert's The Signature of All Things for the authors' book club I belong to. The book was my choice. It's almost guaranteed to spark a lively debate for many reasons. I find myself intrigued by the way that Alma, the main character, can find beauty and wonder in the world around her. It is, I think, a talent well-worth having. To see past the broken, the ugly, and the dirty, and to find pockets of wonder. Perhaps it's a form of gratitude. Instead of taking the world for granted, it's an opportunity to appreciate the moment.I try to do this in my books,…
  • How to Make a Miniature Rustic Bench

    29 Jun 2014 | 1:22 pm
    My sister has this wonderful rustic chair outside her house. It was made with twigs (okay...BIG twigs), and I love it. Right now, rustic/twig furniture is all the small rage. This pattern will work for a real miniature setting (1:12 scale) or for a fairy garden.This was also inspired by the wonderful tutorial by Lesley Shepherd. I urge you to check it out before you start this project. http://miniatures.about.com/od/miniatureprojects/ss/arustictble.htmSUPPLIES:Bendable twigs (I got mine from an Australian pine tree) in a variety of sizes (six, eight, and ten inches?)Twigs of all…
  • How to Make Your New Dad Love You

    15 Jun 2014 | 11:50 am
    A special Father's Day post by Jax, the Havanese puppy.Being adorable is hard work. Time for a nap!Even if that male human wasn't entirely sold on getting a new dog--and a puppy at that--you can change his mind. Here's how:1. When you first meet, leap into your new human Dad's arms and lick his face. Over and over.2. Nibble on his ears while you wiggle with joy.3. When you are in the car on that long ride home, refuse to sit on your new Mama's lap. Crawl into Daddy's lap instead.4. Then fall asleep.5. Wag your tail and look at Dad with adoring eyes when he speaks.6. Go potty whenever he takes…
  • Miniature Basket Tutorial

    13 Jun 2014 | 7:01 am
    This is a fun project that keeps another bit of plastic out of the landfill. Here are two finished versions of this project.SUPPLIES:Empty and clean plastic coffee creamer containerQuilling strip (or strip of paper cut 3/8 inch wide)Duct tape (optional)Masking tape (cut into half inch pieces)ScissorsPunch (optional)Paper to match or contrast with your quilling stripBeads (optional)METHOD:1. Cut the rim off the creamer container.2. Carefully cut the container into spokes. (Tip: Follow the indentations.) (Note: You could use a permanent marker and color the base of your basket--the creamer…
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    Living 2 Read

  • Stages of Life

    11 Jul 2014 | 1:19 pm
    Late in Tessa Hadley's Clever Girl, main character Stella muses that “the highest test was not in what you chose, but in how you lived out what befell you”. She is certainly talking about herself. Each of the book's ten chapters describes what 'befell' Stella in a period of her life, from her childhood with a single mother in postwar Bristol England in the early 1960's, to her own single motherhood and commune life in the 70's, to her married middle age. (If you are a New Yorker reader you may recognize some of the early chapters, which appeared there as short stories). Although Stella…
  • Act II

    24 Jun 2014 | 4:19 pm
    What if the most exciting part of your life occurs before you're old enough to appreciate it? In some ways that's what happened to Jules Jacobson in Meg Wolitzer's “The Interestings” (See my blog). For Joan Joyce in Maggie Shipstead's Astonish Me it comes when, after she has slavishly devoted herchildhood and adolescence to ballet, she is accepted into a company and moves to New York. There she confronts what must be the case for many talented young people – she is very good but she will never be great. And she meets someone who is great – the charismatic Russian dancer Arslan…
  • Summer Friendships

    10 Jun 2014 | 3:54 pm
    Is summer camp a rite of passage? If so, it's one I missed. But for the six characters in Meg Wolitzer's The Interestings, the bond they form in the 70's at a summer arts camp informs their lives for the next three decades. For Julie Jacobson, who arrives in camp as a suburban nonentity and leaves as 'Jules' with five sophisticated urban new best friends, the camp experience is especially transformative. The camp has given them all the sense that they are talented and special, destined for extraordinary lives. In the power center of the six are the Wolf siblings Ash (sister) and Goodman…
  • Texas Saga

    1 May 2014 | 4:50 pm
    Wow, this is not my kind of book. The Son, by Philipp Meyer, is a sprawling, multi-generational saga set in Texas and spanning over 160 years, replete with such standard Western elements as cowboys, Indians, cattle, oil, death, greed, betrayal - not exactly in my wheelhouse. Yes, I loved “Lonesome Dove” - not multi-generational but certainly a saga – but so often books in this genre fall into the cliches of the strong, silent cowboy, the noble savage, the patient wife, the money-grubbing oilmen, the romanticized view of the Old West. So I took advantage of Kindle's option to sample…
  • Fairy Tales

    18 Apr 2014 | 4:05 pm
    The first line of Helen Oyeyemi's Boy, Snow, Bird could have been “Once upon a time”. A fairy-tale quality permeates the story, a modern twist on the Brothers Grimm. A young girl named Boy lives in New York with a violent father who makes his living as a rat-catcher, using techniques that would horrify the Pied Piper. She runs away to the small New England town of Flax Hill, where she marries a man with a beautiful little daughter named Snow. After the birth of her own child Bird, Boy becomes something of an evil stepmother, and the story becomes a distorted version of “Snow White”,…
 
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    The Millions

  • Craft Work

    Thomas Beckwith
    28 Jul 2014 | 11:00 am
    It’s the kind of niggling question that drives a writer mad: is it best to edit a piece after you finish a draft, or is it better to edit while you write? At Electric Lit, Lincoln Michel argues for the latter, on the grounds that it lets writers fix endemic problems before it’s too late. You could also read Lincoln’s 2010 Millions review of the movie Avatar.
  • Tabloid Fodder

    Thomas Beckwith
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    “Sitting down to read The Actress, Amy Sohn’s newest novel, is even better than standing in line at the grocery store while the person in front of you disputes the price of a carton of orange juice, giving you extra time to read the tabloids. The Actress might be as licentious as a tabloid, but it is far more intelligently written. And, you probably won’t be reading it while standing in line inside a grocery store.”
  • Bookshelves Ten Feet High

    Thomas Beckwith
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    Chances are you’ve bragged about the size of your library. The number of books you own is a point of pride for many readers. But at what point does collecting books — which few people would say is a bad thing– turn into a problem? At what point, in other words, does it become hoarding? Pair with: Rebecca Rego-Barry on hunting for rare books at college library book sales.
  • The Son

    Thomas Beckwith
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    He befriended Mark Twain. His father wrote The Scarlet Letter. He drank wine with Oscar Wilde, George Eliot and Henry James, and William Randolph Hearst once hired him as a reporter. He even published a few books to critical acclaim. So why do so few of us know anything about Julian Hawthorne? In the WaPo, Michael Dirda reviews a new biography. (h/t Arts and Letters Daily)
  • The Book That Wasn’t: 5 Fiction Writers Talk About their Novels in Drawers

    Chloe Benjamin
    28 Jul 2014 | 3:14 am
    “For every book I publish,” a writing teacher once told me, “there’s one book I don’t.” At the age of eighteen, armed with a truly bad novel and a rather absurd sense of optimism, this line did not exactly resonate. But as I amassed rejection slips of every size—and once my first novel was rejected by a pantheon of New York publishers—I realized that nearly every writer has a novel in a drawer: a manuscript that, due to any number of reasons (rejection, timing, chance, diversion) never quite becomes a fully-formed book.  By the time an author’s debut hits bookstores, it’s…
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    Boomerang Books Blog

  • What Were Girls Like?

    Joy Lawn
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:52 am
    Three recent YA historical fiction novels by Australian women (all published by HarperCollins/ABC Books) inhabit times when girls had to bend to the influence of men and were comparatively powerless. The Raven’s Wing is Frances Watts’s first novel for teens. It is set in Ancient Rome where fifteen year-old Claudia is strategically offered in marriage several times. Making an alliance which can best help her family is paramount. Primarily a romance, the book addresses Claudia’s growing awareness of human rights (here through the fate of slaves) which interferes with her sense of duty and…
  • Player Profile: Michael Robotham, author of Life Or Death

    Jon Page
    27 Jul 2014 | 8:50 pm
    Michael Robotham, author of Life Or Death Tell us about your latest creation:  LIFE OR DEATH is a love story and a thriller and a story of redemption. It’s a standalone novel that introduces Audie Palmer, a man who has spent a decade in prison for armed robbery, but escapes the day before he’s due to be released. For ten years Audie  has been beaten, stabbed, throttled and threatened by prison guards, inmates and criminal gangs, who all want the answer to the same question – what happened to the money? But Audie isn’t running from trouble. Instead he’s…
  • Doodles and Drafts – Roses are Blue Blog Tour with Sally Murphy

    Dimity Powell
    27 Jul 2014 | 4:08 pm
    I promised myself I wouldn’t cry. Well, maybe a few tears towards the end might be acceptable, but of course, I was dealing with another verse novel by Sally Murphy, so dry eyes were definitely no guarantee. It’s not just the subject matter of Roses are Blue that tugs at ones heartstrings. Murphy is simply master at massaging sensitive issues into refined, understated yet terrifically moving poetic verse. Her words whisper across the pages with the soft intensity of a mountain breeze. They are beautiful and arresting; a joy to read. There are no chapters in this novel. The story ebbs and…
  • The Book Brief: The Very Best New Release Books in August

    Jon Page
    27 Jul 2014 | 3:43 pm
    Each month we bring you the best new release books in our Book Brief Fiction Books Life or Death by Michael Robotham Audie Palmer has spent the last ten years in prison for an armed robbery that netted 7 million dollars. Money that has never been recovered. Everybody wants to know where the money is; other prisoners, guards and various law enforcement. Audie has survived beatings, stabbings and other assaults and is finally due to be released from prison tomorrow. Except he has just escaped. And so begins an epic thriller. Jon The Heist by Daniel Silva Legendary spy and art restorer Gabriel…
  • Aussie New Releases To Look Forward To

    Tracey Allen
    24 Jul 2014 | 10:57 pm
    There are several books by Australian authors being published in the last six months of the year that I’m really looking forward to, so I thought I’d share them with you. The first is already out, and it’s Kate Forsyth‘s Dancing With Knives.  Set on a farm outside Narooma in NSW, Dancing With Knives is a rural murder mystery and a story about love and family secrets. Rebecca James (author of Beautiful Malice and Sweet Damage) is gearing up for the launch of Cooper Bartholomew is Dead in early October.  Cooper Bartholomew is Dead is a psychological thriller…
 
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    AbeBooks' Reading Copy

  • 2014 Man Booker Prize Longlist Announced

    Jessica Doyle
    23 Jul 2014 | 11:48 am
    It’s the day this book nerd has been waiting for since Eleanor Catton was declared the winner of the 2013 Man Booker Prize – today, the 2014 Man Booker Longlist was announced.  Since its founding in 1969 the prize has been awarded to the best novel of the year written by a citizen of the UK, the Commonwealth, or Ireland. In 2013 the Man Booker Prize announced it would include American authors in its consideration for future prizes. Thus, the 2014 longlist includes four Americans – Joshua Ferris, Karen Joy Fowler, Siri Hustvedt and Richard Powers. Six of the 13 books are yet…
  • 5 Debut Novels You Better Hurry Up and Read

    Jessica Doyle
    17 Jul 2014 | 1:05 pm
    I don’t know about you, but I love reading a book by an unknown. Sure, it’s great to dive into a book penned by a favorite author, but you can’t help but approach it with a pile of expectations. Will it be as good as their last?  Will it be better? A debut novelist is someone nobody knows. You can’t compare his or her work to their previous, and your friends can’t impact your judgement with their opinions. Reading an unknown is, in my opinion, quite freeing. Here are five brand new books by brand new novelists to get you started, but based on the media’s glowing reviews these…
  • Nobel-prize-winning author Nadine Gordimer dies at 90

    Jessica Doyle
    14 Jul 2014 | 10:22 am
    Author Nadine Gordimer died peacefully at her Johannesburg home on Sunday, at the age of 90. The South African writer’s novels and stories depicted the drama of human life in a society troubled by racial segregation. She won the Nobel prize in 1991. Gordimer’s works were highly controversial. The Guardian reports, “she had three books banned under the apartheid regime’s censorship laws, along with an anthology of poetry by black South African writers that she collected and had published.” The banned titles include A World of Strangers and Burger’s…
  • Bill Gates reveals his favorite business book & AbeBooks sells every copy of forgotten title from 1969

    Richard Davies
    13 Jul 2014 | 9:44 am
    On Friday, the Wall Street Journal printed an interesting article written by Microsoft tycoon Bill Gates about this favorite business book – Business Adventures by John Brooks. It is a long forgotten out-of-print book published in 1969 containing 12 essays about business that had originally appeared in The New Yorker magazine. Thanks to this article, Business Adventures by John Brooks was the top search term on AbeBooks.com on Friday and Saturday. This morning (Sunday), there are no copies left on the site. A new edition of Business Adventures is being published in September. Until then,…
  • Copy of Das Kapital sells for $40k just as Dow Jones hits record high

    Richard Davies
    4 Jul 2014 | 6:53 pm
    On Thursday,  the day that the Dow Jones index closed at an all-time high of 17,068 points, AbeBooks.com sold a first edition of Karl Marx’s Das Kapital for $40,000. Published in 1867 by Otto Meissner with German text, this copy of Das Kapital was the only one published in Marx’s lifetime (he died in 1883). The book is housed in a slipcover with cloth wrapping. Das Kapital famously attributes the growth of capitalism to the exploitation of labor and the book became the basis for Marxism, which influenced many subsequent political systems and labor movements, including Communism.
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    The Creative Penn

  • Writing Fiction. Improve Your Dialogue With James Scott Bell. Podcast Episode 190

    Joanna Penn
    27 Jul 2014 | 11:51 pm
    When I started writing fiction, I found dialogue to be one of the hardest things to write. It’s rarely used outside of a fiction context, and I spent a lot of time learning all about it. I still do! Today I’m thrilled to be discussing how to improve dialogue with James Scott Bell. This podcast is sponsored by Kobo Writing Life, which helps authors self-publish and reach readers in global markets through the Kobo eco-system. You can also subscribe to the Kobo Writing Life podcast for interviews with successful indie authors. James Scott Bell is the best-selling and…
  • Creative Entrepreneur: Business Models For Authors

    Joanna Penn
    24 Jul 2014 | 11:54 pm
    This is a continuation in the author entrepreneur series of articles. Recently, I posted the arc of the indie author from first book to CEO of your global business. Today we’re focusing on the various business models that authors can use to generate revenue and satisfy customers. Of course, many authors have day jobs which is a great way to pay the bills and writing can then be for fun or extra income, but this article is aimed at authors who are intent on going full-time in this business. Why do you need to define your business model? Defining your business model can help keep you…
  • Make Art. Make Money. Lessons From Jim Henson With Elizabeth Hyde Stevens. Podcast Episode 189

    Joanna Penn
    20 Jul 2014 | 11:44 pm
    In keeping with the author entrepreneur focus of the blog recently, today I’m discussing making art and making money with Elizabeth Hyde Stevens, who wrote a book about Jim Henson’s career, which was both creatively and financially rewarding. In the intro, I talk about my awesome Thrillerfest experience, Kindle Unlimited, the new Kindle pricing tool and my German book launch and first experience with a traditional publisher. This podcast is sponsored by Kobo Writing Life, which helps authors self-publish and reach readers in global markets through the Kobo eco-system. You can…
  • Writing Thrillers. 50 Lessons Learned From Thrillerfest 2014

    Joanna Penn
    17 Jul 2014 | 1:46 am
    My head is still exploding with everything I learned and everyone I met at Thrillerfest this year! Below is a mega-post full of lessons learned about writing, marketing, mindset, self-publishing and the FBI, but I wanted to start with an intro to ITW. Why I love ITW and Thrillerfest I have now been to Thrillerfest twice (you can read my notes from 2012 here), and I can definitely say that it is the only conference where I really feel at home – and ITW is truly the tribe I belong to. I can sit in the bar talking about ways to murder people and weapons of choice and not feel weird. I can…
  • How To Find The Right Editor For Your Book And More Editing Questions Answered

    Joanna Penn
    13 Jul 2014 | 11:08 pm
    These days I’m objecting to the term ‘self-publishing,’ because we all need a team to put a great book out into the world. This is not something you do by yourself. I currently work with a number of people to publish my work, but the one person who I have to trust the most is my editor. Finding an editor is a bit like dating – you have to try a number before you find someone who is the best match. I’ve been through a number of editors in the last few years, and I’m thrilled to now be working with Jen Blood, who is a brilliant editor but also writes the same…
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    WritersDigest.com

  • Writing On the Rails: Survival Tips for Traveling Authors

    James Duncan
    28 Jul 2014 | 11:34 am
    After years of crisscrossing the country by car, plane, train, bus, and even on foot for stretches, one of my favorite modes of transportation remains the railroad. Yes, it can be a little shabby, but not nearly as bad as some bus stations I’ve seen. Plus, it has a great literary history: Jack Kerouac and his Beat buddy Neal Cassady were both railroad employees, and numerous works taking place on the rails continue to thrill us, such as Christie’s Murder on The Orient Express, Theroux’s The Great Railway Bazaar, and Highsmith’s Strangers on a Train. And that’s just the tip of…
  • Advice for Writers: 3 Keys to Connecting With Young Readers Online

    Guest Column
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:48 am
    Social media is a vast space that, like the universe, keeps expanding. It’s a realm where a writer can quickly become overwhelmed: websites, blogs, Listservs, apps, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, Tumblr, Goodreads, YouTube, Google+, Ning, Shelfari, Red Room, StumbleUpon and so on. Social media outlets trend: They come on the scene (Vine), they go (Myspace), and some of them are even designed to self-destruct (Snapchat). And when you’re trying to build an author platform based on outreach to kid and teen readers—who tend to be even more trend-aware than adults—steering…
  • 3 Ways to Save Your Backstory from the Cutting Room Floor

    Adrienne Crezo
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:30 am
    BY SHENNANDOAH DIAZ Backstory is crucial to the novel writing process. It gives your character substance and drive while adding depth, history and realism to your fiction.  It takes a great deal of hard work to develop your character’s backstory. Unfortunately for the sake of the novel, much of that hard work ends up on the cutting room floor. That doesn’t mean all that hard work has gone to waste. There are many ways for you to repurpose those backstories into moneymaking and author platform building opportunities. Shennandoah Diaz is a writer and freelance Branding and…
  • New Literary Agent Alert: Rachel Brooks of L. Perkins Agency

    Chuck Sambuchino
    27 Jul 2014 | 9:18 pm
    Reminder: New literary agents (with this spotlight featuring Rachel Brooks of L. Perkins Agency) are golden opportunities for new writers because each one is a literary agent who is likely building his or her client list.     About Rachel: Before joining the L. Perkins Agency, Rachel worked as an agent apprentice to Louise Fury. In addition to her industry training, Rachel has a business degree and graduated summa cum laude with a BA in English from Texas A&M University-CC. Rachel is actively building her client list. Find her on Twitter: @RachMBrooks. She is seeking: She is…
  • What All Agents Want in a Great Young Adult Novel — July 29 Webinar (With Critique) by Agent Carlie Webber

    Chuck Sambuchino
    27 Jul 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Teens are discriminating readers with a lot of demands on their time, so what can you do to ensure that your novel is the one they’ll all be dying to read? And does your book stand a chance at getting you an agent if it doesn’t have wizards, vampires, or a dystopian setting? Literary agent Carlie Webber will share her ideas on what all agents want in a great YA novel, regardless of subject matter. The live webinar on July 29 will open with a presentation on what it means to write authentic YA voices, and will explain why crafting a YA voice is a different challenge from creating…
 
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    Better World Books

  • This week: Book for Book… for Book!

    Better World Books
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:40 am
    It’s one thing to donate a book every time you buy one. It’s two things to donate two! For three(-ish) days, we doubling our donations—that means not one but two books to our literacy partners for every book purchased on the website. No matter if it’s used or new, this doubles the impact of the donation enabled by your book order for places in the world where books are more difficult to come by. So if you’re feeling a little guilty about your reading budget, consider the difference you’re making in someone’s life. And don’t forget to participate in…
  • Young readers shared these books. And these awesome notes.

    Guest Contributor
    25 Jul 2014 | 8:28 am
    One of the things that inspires us to work here at Better World Books is to join the mission towards literacy. Bringing books to places where books are hard to come by, raising funds around the world, saving books from landfills and finding your old favorite books a home. However there are those days; those Summer days where we would love to be at the beach or by the pool reading our own favorite book as days get hectic here at our warehouse where all the magic happens. It’s very easy to get distracted by everyday life and the stress seems to overcome our little bubble but then we get…
  • Reminder: Don’t forget to submit your video

    Better World Books
    28 Jun 2014 | 12:08 pm
    We recently asked: “What book would you send your younger self?” And the submissions are coming in. If you’ve got a phone or a webcam, be sure to record your video response and let us know here. No matter if it’s 5 seconds, or 5 minutes, we want to know what book you would send your younger self. And once you’re done, don’t forget to vote on other submissions you think are interesting, and share them on Facebook and Twitter. There are some insightful ones on there now, and some funny ones. So let us know your answer, and let others know which responses…
  • Carson Scholars Fund Reading Room Donation

    Better World Books
    28 Jun 2014 | 11:33 am
    We have outgoing book donations in support of literacy and education at all times, but we wanted spotlight this one to let you know about it. We’ve just sent over 2,500 books to the Carson Scholars Fund, an organization that funds reading rooms for schools around the country that are “warm, inviting rooms where children can discover the joy of independent leisure reading.” There are 100 Ben Carson Reading Rooms in 14 different states so far, and counting. From the CarsonScholars.org website: A seventh grader named Sandy said the following about her school’s Ben Carson…
  • Librarians: Have you stopped by our booth at ALA?

    Better World Books
    28 Jun 2014 | 10:51 am
    We mentioned that we’ve got a booth set up at ALA this year in Las Vegas, so here’s a visual so you know what to look for if you’re at the event. Head to booth 1277 and find out about how Better World Books can make your library’s weeding projects have a bigger impact across the board. Here’s a better look at the booth. Come find us while the convention is going on!  
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    JetPak Studio

  • New drawing for Summer heat...

    27 Jul 2014 | 10:20 pm
    I've actually got several titles for this one... World at War really sums it up though for me with all the turmoil in the world these days.
  • THE CARTINI...

    22 Jul 2014 | 10:27 am
    ...it's like a Martini but not. It's my design for my next car. 
  • Dog days of summer drawing...

    21 Jul 2014 | 1:03 pm
  • New color painting! KIRBY!!! (AROK!)

    18 Jul 2014 | 11:37 am
    This is for the Jack Kirby show that's coming up in August. I always loved the way he visually told stories made with crazy bold graphics. This one is taking an extra creature from an old comic book and painting it up in Photoshop while keeping the bold designs that Kirby created.I wanted to do something more complicated but I've got many other projects that need my attention right now so this one will have to suffice.
  • New drawing: "The Fish Peddler"...

    16 Jul 2014 | 2:19 pm
    I've got a bit of a story here with this guy telling tales about what happens when people go out to sea and either try to catch fish or on vacation...
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    The Reader's Advisor Online Blog

  • RA Run Down

    Cindy Orr
    27 Jul 2014 | 9:07 am
    The readers’s advisory librarian’s weekly update, from a scan of more than 100 blogs, newsletters, magazines, newspapers and television. This blog is brought to you by the Reader’s Advisor Online. TRY THE FREE RAO DATABASE based on Libraries Unlimited’s print Genreflecting Advisory series. Give it a whirl and let us know how you like it. We’d love to hear from you. Feel free to comment on any of our posts, or contact us at rablog@librariesunlimited.com. By Cindy Orr and Sarah Statz Cords New to Bestseller Lists This Week: FICTION NONFICTION GRAPHIC BOOKS and…
  • 2014 Coming Attractions

    Cindy Orr
    27 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    Bookreporter: Coming Soon – September About.com: New Book Releases: September Huffington Post: 9 New Books That Would Make Great Movies USA Today: Heat Up Your Summer with 30 New Books Shelflife: Christian Books to Look Forward To Shelflife: Christian Books to Look Forward To, Part 2 Library Journal: Books That Buzzed at ALA Library Journal: Books That Buzzed at ALA, Part 2 Cosmopolitan: Sexy Summer Reads Entertainment Weekly: Summer Must Reads Mystery Sequels: New Mystery Series Released in August Best Fantasy Books: Best Fantasy Books of July and August Library Journal: Quirky books…
  • New, Noteworthy, and No-Brainer

    Cindy Orr
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:31 pm
    To be published the week of Jul 28-Aug 3, 2014: TUESDAY FICTION Alsaid, Adi – Let’s Get Lost (YA) – 9780373211241 Andersen, Susan – No Strings Attached – 9780373778874 Andrews, Ilona – Magic Breaks – 9780425256220 Bloom, Amy – Lucky Us – 9781400067244 – 125,000 print run Brunstetter, Wanda E. – The Healing Quilt – 9781616260873 Carcaterra, Lorenzo – The Wolf - 9780345483942 – 50,000 Carter, Stephen L. – Back Channel - 9780385349604 Cast, P. C. – Kalona’s Fall (YA) – 9781250046116 De…
  • RA Run Down

    Cindy Orr
    20 Jul 2014 | 10:31 am
    The readers’s advisory librarian’s weekly update, from a scan of more than 100 blogs, newsletters, magazines, newspapers and television. This blog is brought to you by the Reader’s Advisor Online. TRY THE FREE RAO DATABASE based on Libraries Unlimited’s print Genreflecting Advisory series. Give it a whirl and let us know how you like it. We’d love to hear from you. Feel free to comment on any of our posts, or contact us at rablog@librariesunlimited.com. By Cindy Orr and Sarah Statz Cords New to Bestseller Lists This Week: FICTION NONFICTION YA
  • New, Noteworthy, and No-Brainer

    Cindy Orr
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:12 pm
    To be published the week of Jul 21-27, 2014: MONDAY FICTION Patterson, James – Homeroom Diaries (YA)- 9780316207621 – 500,000 print run MONDAY NONFICTION Allen, Arthur – The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl – 9780393081015 TUESDAY FICTION Adler, Elizabeth – The Last to Know – 9781250019929 – 75,000 Estep, Jennifer – Poison Promise – 9781476771502 Greaney, Mark – Tom Clancy: Support and Defend – 9780399173349 – 100,000 Jance, J.A. – Remains of Innocence – 9780062134707 – 150,000 Leigh, Lora – Taken…
 
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    Minnesota Reads

  • High Expectations Work Against ‘The Visionist’

    Will A
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    Was it fair of me to expect more of Rachel Urquhart’s The Visionist? I don’t know, but I did, and my experience with it suffered, perhaps unfairly, because of that. Every contextual clue about this book, from its pricey-looking cover art to its intelligent-sounding premise, made me think I was in for a multi-layered and intriguing story. Instead, what I got was a perfectly serviceable piece of historical fiction – nothing less, nothing more. The Visionist centers around Polly Kimball, who kills her abusive father by burning down their farmhouse and hides out among a nearby community of…
  • Fever for the Flavor

    Christa
    22 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    In the worlds Megan Abbott creates teenaged girls are these lean-limbed, silk-haired raw beauties who sweat something that smells like strawberry lip gloss. They travel in packs and those packs have a hierarchy. And they wield, whether knowingly or not, a terrific power over their female peers, boys, men, sometimes adult women, and certainly parents. They behave in ways they don’t necessarily understand, and then take the T-shirt they were wearing and crush it, guiltily, into a ball. Her latest young adult novel, The Fever, is set in upstate New York where something is going around. It…
  • Pants on Fire

    Jodi Chromey
    21 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    Some of my favorite reading experiences involve reaching that tipping point in a book where you make a conscious decision to eschew every other thing in your life to finish the book. That happened to me the other night in the midst of E. Lockhart’s We Were Liars. I can’t remember what exactly tipped me over into obsession. What I do remember is that spent a good three-and-a-half hours racing to finish the book. It was a good race with a finish I could see coming, but didn’t wholly mind. Cadence Sinclair Easton is a member of such a ridiculously wealthy family that the entire…
  • Worth Every Second of the Wait

    Jodi Chromey
    17 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    After reading Christa’s review of Bryan Lee O’Malley’s Scott Pilgrimseries, I’m inclined to think 2010 was some kind of golden year in literature that has yet to be duplicated. This has nothing to do with Bryan Lee O’Malley’s fabulous new standalone graphic novel Seconds. I only mention it because I wanted to refer you to that time when Christa & I went Pilgrim-crazy back in the summer of 2010. It’s been four long years waiting for O’Malley’s follow-up to Scott. Holding Seconds in your hand, it’s lovely 3/4 book jacket you…
  • Shades of Gould

    Christa
    16 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    From the safety of seven years, a decade away, I can now say that we all went a little capital I-for-internet, insane in the mid-2000s. Here we were with this way of connecting with practically everyone with with access to home row and we used it. Hell yes, we used it. We adopted a sort of drunken, devil-may-care personae and wrote minute replays of everything from grilled cheese sandwiches to one-night makeouts. We gave enemies nicknames and embellished fan fiction about their yolk-stained cordaroys. We were so, so. . . loud. At the same time, shit was exploding everywhere. Our Readers…
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    Great Books that I liked

  • Break In (Published in 1985) - Defending his family - Authored by Dick Francis

    28 Jul 2014 | 11:29 am
    He is gearing up for a three mile steeplechase - the Sunday Towncrier Trophy (which took place on a Saturday, and was given news coverage on Sunday). His horse was North Face, winner of thirty eight races, thirty seven of which have been with Kit Fielding. As he is preoccupied with thoughts of the race, his sister comes in to meet him - one look and Kit is aware that Holly, who hates to drive, hasn’t come to visit , but drove one hundred and fifty miles from Newmarket because something was wrong. However, prone to superstition before a big race, he doesn’t encourage her to confide in him…
  • Banker (Published in 1982) - Authored by Dick Francis, about a murder and a banker

    27 Jul 2014 | 1:45 am
    Never one to disappoint, Francis couples equine mystery and white collar fraud in the Banker. The story spans three years. Timothy Ekaterin is a banker at the Paul Ekaterin Merchant Bank Ltd, great grandson of the founder. He is met with the ludicrous sight of his sensible boss Gordon Michael, ‘one of the steadiest banking brains in London’ - standing in his pinstripe suit (what's wrong with that?) - in a fountain in the forecourt. As he helps the delirious man out of the watery abode, Gordon keeps mumbling something about the people with white faces who need to be standing alongside him…
  • The Danger (Published in 1983) - About kidnapping, authored by Dick Francis

    26 Jul 2014 | 6:48 am
    Five weeks, three days, ten hours - that’s how long it’s been since twenty three year old Alessia Cenci has gone missing, aka kidnapped. Andrew Douglas, partner, Liberty Market Ltd, an insurance company, where he is adviser on kidnappings - is the man sent to bring back the young jockey and deliver the ransom, in Bologna, Italy. He is suave, collected and clever, making him the perfect negotiator in ransom cases, within the ‘circles’, he is looked upon with respect for his many successes. When Alessia, one of the best female jockeys in the world, is kidnapped, as she drives home in…
  • Even Money (Published in 2009) - Sudden appearance of a father - Authored by Dick Francis and Felix Francis

    25 Jul 2014 | 4:42 am
    Ned Talbot has a clear perspective of who is, rather who he is perceived to be - a pariah. The sort of creature that makes for the underbelly of the racetrack - a bookie. The closet snobbery and class divide is obvious, stock broking is white collar, whereas punters socializing with bookies is strictly a ‘NO’. Ned and his assistant Luca are able to make decent profits and sizeable losses as they ply their trade at Royal Ascot and other small racecourses. A second generation bookie, he has seen the trade descend into depravity - from being an art form, almost where transactions were…
  • Second Wind (Published in 1999) - Authored by Dick Francis, not about horses

    24 Jul 2014 | 12:18 pm
    What is most enthralling and refreshing about Dick Francis is the ease with which he introduces myriad backdrops for his story telling, all well founded on his equine love and past as a steeplechase jockey. Second Wind is the story about a meteorologist Perry Stuart, who, along with his friend Kris Ironside, work for the BBC. He lives with and loves his grandmother, who offers clear, sensible advice from time to time – ‘If you can’t fix it, think of something else.’The two men fly in Kris’s Piper Cherokee, a single engine low winged aeroplane, almost as old as the friends - thirty.
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    Black Heart Magazine

  • Nathan Deuel, what’s in your mug?

    Laura Roberts
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    Coffee and creativity are intricately intertwined. Some might even say coffee is responsible for all of the world’s great works of literature. Here at Black Heart, we like our coffee like we like our literature: intense, bold, and freshly pressed. But we also wondered what some of our favorite authors were drinking while they penned their latest masterpieces. So we tracked them down and made ‘em answer the question What’s in your mug? Nathan Deuel is the author of Friday Was the Bomb, a collection of essays from five years spent in the Middle East, published by Dzanc Books. He has been…
  • Metaphysics of Granular (Dis)Position by Katie Brunero

    Danielle White
    27 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    There is someone perched on the beams above you, Left leg swinging, Doggy paddling through dust. She’s placing stones like fresh eggs in the rafter corners Hoping to impress you, or upon you, Some unique meaning, Or something wild seeming. There’s map in that seagull’s stomach. Between bone and sand pushed in by the waves Some soft spots are still visible. When I speak the meaning I spit grit. Grit grin, is a mouth worth speaking? [I’m asking your opinion] They say to suck on stones when you are thirsty. Gargle them and overcome a lisp. Rub to calm. But there is nothing worth my hand…
  • REVIEW: Dry Bones in the Valley by Tom Bouman

    Kristen Valentine
    26 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    Reviewed by Kristen Valentine A good sense of place is a must in almost every story, especially one that strives for an atmospheric gloom that makes you feel the mud under your boots. Tom Bouman’s Dry Bones in the Valley does an astoundingly fine job with setting–the backwoods of eastern Pennsylvania near the New York state line, a rural frontier abounding with drug trade and hydrofracking. The people are hard-working, hard-drinking loners, the properties are expansive, and the secrets run deep. Throughout the entire novel, I was with him every step of the way in terms of his…
  • Syzygy by Erik Pederson

    Danielle White
    23 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    She used to be a part of earth When things like planets still being made. Every hominid has looked to her & loved & lusted. When humans kept records oral then written she was the night goddess. The humans of science say she is a rock that is 1/80th of earth’s mass always smiling with the same deformed face controlling the tides. I don’t want to know the heart break that would reverberate through time when she dies. Like Beethoven’s Symphony no.5 I can hear it now 210 years after. Ludwig looked at that moon & now he’s dead & still can’t hear a thing.
  • 3 Poems by Casey Rocheteau

    Danielle White
    20 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    Illegal 205,000 salted wounds. Parents taken from children. Surviving boats shoved back across Mediterranean divide. Apartheid flooding Gaza. Detention without charge. Force fed without trial. Bullets across the US border. A mother’s carrion becomes a valley of dry bone. Fallible humans make fallible laws make plums bust open and pits sucked dry. Torture. This world begs the question: if a neighbor arrived in the darkest part of night bloody and calling your name, would you answer, or fire shots through your own front door? “Plums Massacre” image by Flickr user Scotty You Only…
 
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    Flavorwire » Books

  • Stephen Colbert, Lena Dunham — Yes, Even James Franco — and the Era of Celebrity as Bookseller

    Jason Diamond
    28 Jul 2014 | 11:00 am
    I wrote a post a few years ago about Jewel’s 1998 bestselling book of poetry, A Night Without Armor. The book, while undeniably terrible, has probably sold more copies in one year than the bestselling books of poetry from the last five years combined. What does that tell you? For one, it says that with all the great poetry out there, the general public has really bad taste. But it also speaks volumes about the fact that a celebrity name attached to a book — whether they wrote it or not — sells copies. And although there was probably no study as to how much extra time customers stood…
  • 10 of the Most Depressing Places in Literature

    Jason Diamond
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    After reading Tara Isabella Burton’s American Reader essay, “The Geography of Melancholy,” it’s natural to find yourself thinking about the most depressing cities, towns, and municipalities in literature. Burton points out that, in the real world, “Nearly every historic city has its brand of melancholy indelibly associated with it — each variety linked to the scars the city bears.” She also connects writers and the cities that influenced them — “Baudelaire’s Paris, Zweig’s Vienna, Morris’s Trieste.” There are many more, of course —…
  • Three Previously Out-of-Print J.D. Salinger Stories Published

    Jason Diamond
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:02 am
    Is it the great literary heist of 2014? Readers are about to see what’s been called “the first legitimately published book by JD Salinger in some 50 years.” Small publisher Devault-Graves, realizing that the rights to three Salinger stories from the 1940s — “The Young Folks,” “Go See Eddie” and “Once a Week Won’t Kill You” — were up for grabs, has purchased the rights to publish them. As they told Publisher’s Weekly: After an “exhaustive” search that involved a team of intellectual property attorneys and…
  • 10 Poetic Tributes to Cats

    Alison Nastasi
    27 Jul 2014 | 10:12 am
    Esteemed American poet T. S. Eliot had a deep love of cats, evidenced in his 1939 collection of humorous poems Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats. The whimsical work was originally composed to amuse his godchildren and friends, but became admired by feline fanciers the world over (inspiring the Andrew Lloyd Webber Cats). Open Culture featured an audiobook version of Eliot’s poems on their website this week, with readings from the author himself. In the spirit of Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats, we collected ten other poems for pussycats — tributes to their mystique and…
  • 20 Mind-Bending Aldous Huxley Book Covers

    Alison Nastasi
    26 Jul 2014 | 10:39 am
    Today marks the 120th birthday of English novelist and prolific essayist Aldous Huxley. The Brave New World author’s scathing critique of the mass media and the government (and their use of technology) positioned him at the center of intellectual discourse and made him one of the most widely read science fiction authors of his time. Huxley’s vision of a dystopian society, his experiences with psychedelics, and his fascination with parapsychology and philosophical mysticism are evident throughout his works — and his book covers. Inspired by the author’s mind-bending tales and theories,…
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    Pixel of Ink

  • July 28th Evening Edition: Kindle Deals & Steals

    Pixel of Ink
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:31 am
    Ready for some more great reads? Check out this selection for your Kindle tonight! For non-U.S. readers, Kindle content availability and pricing will vary. Genre: Contemporary Fiction, Dystopian, Mystery, Romance, Travel The Sound Of Footsteps by Diane Patterson Still free? Click Here to find out! Ghosts are fun. Ghosts are easy to deal with. Ghosts aren’t real. Reality is where the trouble starts. Drusilla Thorne and her sister Stevie need a place to live in San Antonio while Drusilla sets up her new identity. The place they find is definitely cheap – the landlord can’t find…
  • [Hot Deal] The Boys in the Boat – Save $14

    Pixel of Ink
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:11 am
    The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown Genre: Sports The #1 New York Times–bestselling story about American Olympic triumph in Nazi Germany. For readers of Unbroken, out of the depths of the Depression comes an irresistible story about beating the odds and finding hope in the most desperate of times – the improbable, intimate account of how nine working-class boys from the American West showed the world at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin what true grit really meant. It was an unlikely quest from the start. With a team composed of the sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the…
  • July 28th Morning Edition: Kindle Deals & Steals

    Pixel of Ink
    28 Jul 2014 | 5:59 am
    For even more of the best eBook deals, be sure to check Pixel of Ink every day! For non-U.S. readers, Kindle content availability and pricing will vary. Genre: Biographies & Memoirs, Mystery, Romance, Suspense, Thriller Survivors by T. J. Brearton Still free? Click Here to find out! The phone rings. One of Brendan Healy’s oldest and best friends is dead. Healy must return home to Hawthorne to found out why. Meanwhile, Agent Jennifer Aitken is investigating the same dark conspiracy involving politicians, prostitution, and black markets. The trail will put both her and Brendan’s life in…
  • July 27th Evening Edition: Kindle Deals & Steals

    Pixel of Ink
    27 Jul 2014 | 9:34 am
    Keep your Kindle full and happy with tonight’s great reads! For non-U.S. readers, Kindle content availability and pricing will vary. Genre: Amish, Biographies & Memoirs, Fantasy, Mystery, Romance Dream Kisses by Verna Clay Still free? Click Here to find out! Dream Kisses kicks off the series with Sarah Carter, a.k.a Mims Murphy, meeting Sage Tanner at Imaginings Publishing while he’s posing for the cover of her soon-to-be-released romance novel. After being bulldozed into a coffee break with him by her publisher, an embarrassing incident upsets Sarah and she walks out. Of…
  • [Save 87%] The Hiltons: The True Story of an American Dynasty

    Pixel of Ink
    27 Jul 2014 | 5:45 am
    The Hiltons: The True Story of an American Dynasty by J. Randy Taraborrelli Genre: Nonfiction The Hiltons is a sweeping saga of the success-and excess-of an iconic American family. Demanding and enigmatic, patriarch Conrad Hilton’s visionary ideas and unyielding will established the model for the modern luxury hotel industry. But outside the boardroom, Conrad struggled with emotional detachment, failed marriages, and conflicted Catholicism. Then there were his children: Playboy Nicky Hilton’s tragic alcoholism and marriage to Elizabeth Taylor was the stuff of tabloid legend.
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    firewireblog.com

  • Watch The First Trailer For Mad Max: Fury Road

    Larry Fire
    28 Jul 2014 | 9:12 am
    Warner Bros. Pictures and Village Roadshow Pictures have released the first trailer for George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road. Mad Max: Fury Road is the fourth film of George Miller’s Road Warrior/Mad Max franchise and is co-written and directed by Miller. The post-apocalyptic action film is set in the furthest reaches of our planet, in a stark desert landscape where humanity is broken, and most everyone is crazed fighting for the necessities of life. Within this world of fire and blood exist two rebels on the run who just might be able to restore order. There’s Max (Tom Hardy), a man of…
  • The Walking Dead Season 5 Trailer

    Larry Fire
    27 Jul 2014 | 11:35 am
    A new trailer for the fifth season of AMC‘s hit television series The Walking Dead reminds everyone that nobody’s safe. The trailer was initially released at San Diego Comic-Con 2014. The fifth season is scheduled to premiere October 12, 2014 at 9PM.  
  • Disney Infinity: Marvel Super Heroes Will Be Available On September 23, 2014

    Larry Fire
    27 Jul 2014 | 1:00 am
    Disney Interactive confirmed this week that the highly anticipated Disney Infinity: Marvel Super Heroes will be available at North American retailers on Tuesday, September 23, 2014. The sequel to the #1 best-selling new family IP of 2013 expands the platform with the introduction of all new super-powered Marvel Play Sets and characters that players can experience exclusively inside of the new version of the game. The popular Toy Box mode also returns with enhanced features where users can create their own adventures and share them online with friends. Additionally, the company announced…
  • Guardians of The Galaxy 2 Is Coming On July 28, 2017

    Larry Fire
    26 Jul 2014 | 9:51 pm
    Marvel Studios just announced at their Hall H panel at the San Diego Comic-Con, that the studio will release Guardians of The Galaxy 2  on July 28, 2017. James Gunn will write the screenplay and direct the film. The first Guardians of the Galaxy film opens next Friday, August 1, and stars Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, Dave Bautista, Vin Diesel, Bradley Cooper, Lee Pace, Karen Gillan, Michael Rooker, Djimon Hounsou, John C. Reilly, Glenn Close and Benicio del Toro.
  • Marvel Announces New Line of Star Wars Comics

    Larry Fire
    26 Jul 2014 | 3:41 pm
    At the Marvel Cup o’ Joe panel at the 2014 Comic-Con International: San Diego, the publisher announced a brand new line of comics featuring the character from the original Star Wars trilogy. Three titles were announced, with the first being an ongoing series simply titled Star Wars, written by Jason Aaron (Original Sin, Thor: God of Thunder) and drawn by John Cassaday (Uncanny Avengers, Astonishing X-Men). The series picks up after the event of Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope, with Luke Skywalker, Leia Organa and Han Solo leading the Rebel Alliance, emboldened by their…
 
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    The Truth About Lies

  • The Appointment

    27 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    [T]here's nothing to think about, because I myself am nothing, apart from being summoned. - Herta Müller, The Appointment After Herta Müller won the Nobel Prize in 2009 I, I imagine like a number of others, went out and tracked down a copy of one of her books to see what the fuss was all about. Like many Nobel laureates I’d never heard of her before and felt bad about that. The book I ended up reading was The Passport which I reviewed here. In my article I included the following quote: A year after my departure from Romania in 1987, Jenny came to visit in Berlin. Since the time of the…
  • Smut: Two Unseemly Stories

    20 Jul 2014 | 3:30 am
    "... How much better ... how much healthier ... had all these persons, these family members, been more candid with one another right from the start. – Alan Bennett, Smut Sex is a part of life, in fact without sex there’d be no life. I’m less curious about it than I used to be but I still find I can be distracted from what I’m doing when some salacious news item passes my way. Little actually shocks me. It just underlines how narrow my own life experiences have been and how poorly I understand people. I’m as puzzled by people who practice auto-erotic asphyxia as I am by people who…
  • Rue End Street

    13 Jul 2014 | 3:30 am
    I’ve had enough of grown-ups lying or not telling me the truth. I’m twelve years old. I can milk cows, for heaven’s sake. – Sue Reid Sexton, Rue End Street CONTAINS SPOILERSSequels are a tricky business. It’s easy to see their appeal, both from an author’s perspective and a reader’s, but they’re fraught with dangers. With a standalone novel there’s little basis for expectations, whatever the blurb says and we all know how misleading blurbs can be. You might wonder if the book might go this way and that—especially if, as the case here, it’s a work of historical…
  • Depth

    6 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Very deep. You should send that in to the Reader's Digest. They've got a page for people like you. ― Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy One of the last things my first wife said to me before she walked out the door was, “You know, you’re not deep. You think you are but you’re not.” That hurt me more than her leaving me. To this day, some thirty years later, it still stings. The fact is she was right—I wasn’t nearly as deep as I thought I was (what twenty-odd-year-old is?)—but I was (and continue to be) terribly interested in deep things. What exactly…
  • The Book of Unknown Americans

    29 Jun 2014 | 3:30 am
    I don’t need anyone’s pity. My life has been what it has been. It’s not a wonderful story, but it’s mine. – Cristina Henríquez, The Book of Unknown Americans How to tell a story: Well, you begin at the beginning and work your way towards the end. Easy. Few stories, however, are as straightforward as they first appear. On the surface The Book of Unknown Americans tells a simple enough story: Arturo Rivera relocates his family from Mexico to the United States so his fifteen-year-old daughter, who sustained a brain injury whilst helping him out on his construction site, can go to a…
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    Novelicious.com | The Women's Fiction Blog for Readers and Writers

  • The Book That Changed My Life: Gabrielle Zevin Picks Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White

    Novelicious
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:30 am
    From the age of six until the age of ten, I moved three times, which meant I changed schools three times. Consequently, my education had gaps and overlaps in it that it might not have otherwise had. One such overlap was that I ended up reading the children’s book, Charlotte’s Web, with three different classes.  For those who haven’t read it, Charlotte’s Web by E.B. White is about a pig named Wilbur who learns that his fate, like the fate of most pigs, is to become next year’s bacon. It’s about a spider, the titular Charlotte, who comes up with a plan to save Wilbur. The story…
  • Novelicious Picks...Books with a Novella Attached

    Helen
    28 Jul 2014 | 5:30 am
    A fortnight ago we highlighted five books that have been published as ebook serials. This week we bring you novellas available as an ebook that are linked to a traditionally published novel. A bonus story, if you like, of familiar characters you have come to love and want to have that little bit more of. Often they are published as a Christmas short story, but this isn't always the case. Here are five of our favourites: 1. The Beach Cafe followed by the novella Christmas at the Beach Cafe by Lucy Diamond.  Evie Flynn, dreamer and drifter, is working as a temp and has a sensible boyfriend.
  • Write Your Novel – Treat Yourself

    Sarah Painter
    28 Jul 2014 | 3:30 am
    If you're struggling to write and are starting to suspect that you might be (whisper it) 'blocked', I have a gentle suggestion ... be nice to yourself. Reward yourself for even trying. Yes, sometimes tough love is the way forward; lots of chest beating (ouch!) and yelling motivational slogans at yourself in the mirror ('just do it' and 'you're a tiger, grrr'). Sometimes, however, this just doesn't work, and continuing to try and push yourself is only going to make your creative block worse. If you're feeling anxious about your writing and, let's be honest, you probably are, then increasing…
  • Review – Undertaking Love by Kat French

    Novelicious
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:30 am
    Reviewed by Victoria Sutton Marla Jacobs owns and runs The Little White Wedding chapel in the sleepy Shropshire countryside. Her business is her pride and joy and it is nationally acclaimed as the place to go for a wedding with a difference. So when she hears a funeral parlour is to open in the neighbouring building she is far less than impressed. Death and Weddings definitely do not go together! Out of fear of losing her beloved wedding business, she declares war on the funeral parlour and its, alarmingly charming, proprietor Gabriel Ryan. Gabe is the youngest of the Ryan clan. After the…
  • My Book Deal Moment by Lisa Dickenson

    Cressida McLaughlin
    25 Jul 2014 | 6:30 am
    About one month before my book deal moment there was hardly anyone in the world who knew that I liked to write. I expect it’s the same with a lot of you author-to-bes.  Admitting to the world, or even to your friends and family, that you’d like to, maybe, one day, if possible, be an author is mega-scary, and opens up a part of you to judgment and criticism (and praise, hopefully, but the threat of everyone you know thinking your story idea is bloody awful outweighs the potential positives).  It’s scary because it invites two incredibly hard questions every time people see you:…
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    Brandi Breathes Books

  • Review: Sharing Sam by Katherine Applegate

    Brandi Kosiner
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    Sharing Sam (Love Stories For Young Adults #2) by Katherine ApplegateHow can you take the guy your best friend loves . . . when your best friend’s going to die?Alison Chapman has always believed she’d fall in love hard. And she does—with Sam Cody, a new guy with a gorgeous face and brooding eyes, a guy who’s impossible to resist. When Sam asks her to the Valentine’s Day dance, Alison is elated . . . until she finds out that her best friend, Isabella Cates-Lopez, has fallen for Sam,too . . . until she finds out that Isabella is dying. Now Alison wants Isabella’s last days to be her…
  • Brandi Breathes Books Stacking the Shelves, The Sunday Post, Bought Borrowed and Bagged

    Brandi Kosiner
    26 Jul 2014 | 12:30 am
    Stacking the Shelves is hosted by Tynga's Reviews,  check it out and sign up  hereThe Sunday Post is a weekly meme hosted by Kimba the Caffeinated Book Reviewer ~ It's a chance to share news~ A post to recap the past week on your blog, showcase books and things we have received and share news about what is coming up on our blog for the week ahead.Bought, Borrowed, & Bagged is a weekly meme, hosted by TalkSupe, where I share with you the books I have bought, borrowed, or bagged. Link up with me here.Currently Reading:The Raven Boys (The Raven Cycle, #1)source:…
  • Giveaway: Winterspell, 100 Sideways Miles and Learning Not to Drown

    Brandi Kosiner
    25 Jul 2014 | 1:51 pm
    ARCs: Winterspell, 100 Sideways Miles and Learning Not to Drown -Winterspell, 100 Sideways Miles and Learning Not to Drown (Us only)-Fill out Rafflecopter to enter-Ends on 8/10/2014 11:59 pm EST-If you win a review on your blog and/or amazon is appreciated but not required.*If, for whatever reason, the Rafflecopter widget does not appear, you can click on the link where it says rafflecopter giveaway and it will show up, sorry for the inconvenience.a Rafflecopter giveaway
  • Giveaway: Ebook Nature’s Unbalance or The Chosen by Andrea Buginsky

    Brandi Kosiner
    25 Jul 2014 | 12:07 pm
    Nature’s Unbalance: The Chosen Book Two by Andrea BuginskyDuring a time of celebration for The Chosen, a mysterious force appears on Phantasma, threatening to destroy Nature and all of her creatures. Will The Chosen find and defeat this force and save Nature before it’s too late?Excerpt | Reviews | VideoAmazon Kindle | Barnes & Noble Nook | PrintBook 1The ChosenHalli thought she was just another dwarf, living a quiet life in Drumple, her village on Phantasma. When Queen Laurali of the elves shows up, Halli’s entire life changes. She learns the truth about herself, and must quickly…
  • Behind the Scenes of Brandi Breathes Books

    Brandi Kosiner
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:48 am
    I know that there are several memes going around about getting to know the blogger outside of books, but I am doing it because Lexxie from (Un)Conventional Book Views feature Up Close and (un)Conventional.So, the first thing that you should know about me is that I am a family woman. I am a stay at home mom, and I love my girls, Katie and Jillian. I am married to Allan and we've celebrated 7 years of marriage. This is me with Katie, my oldest, my mom and my grandma. My mom lives with us now, and has since my dad passed. I grew up with my grandma and she was on of my favorite people ever.
 
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    The Official BookBuzzr BlogThe Official BookBuzzr Blog

  • 5 BookBuzzr AuthorPage Widgets to Inspire You in July 2014

    Ranga
    25 Jul 2014 | 2:23 am
      1. Teresa Carlson – Creatures of Snow   2. Clarissa O. Clemens – The Poetic Art of Seduction -The Erotic Poetry Collection – Vol.1-3   3. Charles R. Sabo – The Feasts, The Harvest and The Resurrection   4. TK Toppin – To Catch A Marlin   5. Lissette Ortiz – Through the Eyes of Maria: Choices _________________________________________________________________________________________________________   Naveen manages the social media marketing at BookBuzzr.
  • 5 BookBuzzr Widget Installations to Inspire You in July 2014

    Naveen
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:27 am
      1. Richard Sutton – Back to Santa Fe   2. Dana David – Punkie   3. Sarah Nicholson – The Evolutionary Journey of Woman: From the Goddess to Integral Feminism   4. Riya Anne Polcastro – Suicide in Tiny Increments: A Tragic Comedy   5. Aji Michael – The Next Maverick: Ready To Shape The Future _________________________________________________________________________________________________________   Naveen manages the social media marketing at BookBuzzr.
  • 5 Questions with Justine Schofield of Pubslush

    Naveen
    22 Jul 2014 | 11:43 pm
    Pubslush is a global crowdfunding and analytics platform for the literary world. The Pubslush name is derived from its founders’, Hellen and Amanda Barbara, mission to give authors the opportunity to get out of the slush pile, prove their talent and market viability, and successfully publish quality books. We recently had the pleasure and opportunity of interviewing Justine Schofield, development director at Pubslush, a niche global crowdfunding platform for the literary world.   1. What is Pubslush? Why should authors use it? Pubslush is a global pre-publication platform that allows…
  • The Popular BookBuzzr Flipper Now Works on the iPhone

    Naveen
    17 Jul 2014 | 5:24 am
    You asked and we listened. The BookBuzzr Flipper now works on the iPhone and related devices (like Android phones and iPads). The Flipper was the original widget that we created at BookBuzzr and over 18,000 books (created by over 11,000 authors) are now available in the flip book format. In case you’re new to BookBuzzr here is a recap of the BookBuzzr Flipper. Your book excerpt shows as a flip book which pages that turn like in a real book … just like the way you envisioned your book when you first wrote it. You can bundle additional information about your book inside your…
  • 5 Questions with Best Selling Author Sharon Bayliss

    Naveen
    3 Jul 2014 | 11:48 pm
      BookBuzzr author Sharon Bayliss’ book – Destruction: The December People, Book One recently hit the #1 spot on the Amazon. We reached out to Sharon to learn more about her story. The screenshot below was taken on June 20, 2014.   Hi Sharon, thank you for taking the time to do this interview. 1. How did you begin writing? Did you intend to become an author, or do you have a specific reason or reasons for writing each book?  I have been writing fiction since I was fifteen. I clearly remember when my English teacher pulled me aside and told me I was talented. That gave me the…
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    B-Lines and Felines

  • This Week’s Films (20/07/14)

    Dave Brown
    20 Jul 2014 | 6:56 am
    Trishna (2011) Trishna (Freida Pinto, Slumdog Millionaire) lives with her family in a village in Rajasthan, India’s largest state. As the eldest daughter, she works in a nearby resort to help pay the bills. Jay (Riz Ahmed, Four Lions) is the wealthy son of a property developer. When he takes up managing a resort at his father’s request, he meets Trishna at a dance and their fates cross. Jay finds every opportunity to win Trishna’s affection and she accepts his efforts with shy curiosity. But when the two move to Mumbai and become a couple, Jay’s deep family bond…
  • This Week’s Films (13/07/14)

    Dave Brown
    13 Jul 2014 | 3:54 am
    Blitz (2011) Tough, uncompromising and totally un-PC cop Brant (Jason Statham) joins forces with Officer DC Porter Nash (Paddy Considine) to hunt down a serial killer (Aiden Gillen) who has been targeting police officers. This fast-paced action-thriller is a raw, gritty tale of moral ambiguity, outsiders and the sacrifices the police make to keep crime off the streets. Verdict: 7/10 Go to top What Doesn’t Kill You (2008) Brian (Mark Ruffalo) and Paulie (Academy Award® nominee Ethan Hawke, Best Actor In a Supporting Role for Training Day, 2001) are two lifelong friends who grew up like…
  • Dave’s Odyssey #31

    Dave Brown
    11 Jul 2014 | 10:58 am
    In May 2008, I went travelling on my own for the first time and was out of England for a month. Along the way I took in Singapore, New Zealand, Australia and Thailand before coming home. I kept a journal of my time on the road, so here’s a day by day account of my trials and tribulations that has the undeserved title of Dave’s Odyssey.  Day 31 – Thailand – Home Despite being an hour behind schedule the pilot managed to trim our flight down to 11 hours. At first I tried numerous times to get some sleep, as I’d be catching three trains before returning to Barnsley. I did…
  • Masterpieces #24: Grandia

    Dave Brown
    9 Jul 2014 | 1:34 pm
    About Grandia (1999)Grandia, one of the most popular role-playing games (RPG) in recent history, is now available exclusively for the PlayStation game console. RPG fans will welcome Grandia’s imaginative, vibrant and detailed gameplay, which is complemented by a strong character-driven story, set in a warm and inviting world. Developed by Game Arts, the producers of Alisa Dragoon and the Lunar series, Grandia is an RPG masterpiece, loaded with innovative gameplay features and scenarios that will captivate players, providing more than 70 hours of gameplay. Grandia is an extraordinary…
  • This Week’s Films (06/07/14)

    Dave Brown
    6 Jul 2014 | 6:38 am
    Metallica: Some Kind of Monster (2004) Featuring the most successful heavy metal band of all time, METALLICA: SOME KIND OF MONSTER offers a revealing and exclusive behind-the-scenes look at the legendary band as they confront personal demons and their relationships with each other while recording their Grammy-winning album, St. Anger. Verdict: 8/10 Go to top The Time That Remains (2009) Covering the years from 1948 to the present day, writer/director Elia Suleiman’s THE TIME THAT REMAINS is a humorous, heartbreaking film that explores life among the Israeli Arab community, shot largely…
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    Vampire Book Club

  • Early Review: Magic Breaks by Ilona Andrews (Kate Daniels #7)

    Krista
    27 Jul 2014 | 10:01 pm
    Magic Breaks (Kate Daniels #7) Ilona Andrews Published: July 29, 2014 (Ace) Purchase: Book Depository or Amazon Review source: Provided by publisher in exchange for an honest review Reviewed by: Krista Rating (out of 5): 4.5 stars Note: While this review will be spoiler free, it does reference events from previous books in the series. If you haven’t started yet, check out VBC’s review of book 1, Magic Bites When I finally got Magic Breaks in my grubby little hands I was filled with both glee and anxiety. It wasn’t that I had a shred of doubt that latest outing from Ilona Andrews…
  • Review: Gilded Lily by Delphine Dryden (Steam and Seduction #3)

    Amanda
    24 Jul 2014 | 10:01 pm
    Gilded Lily (Steam and Seduction #3) Delphine Dryden Published: July 1, 2014 (Berkley Sensation) Purchase: Book Depository or Amazon Review source: Purchased Reviewed by: Amanda Rating (out of 5): 3.5 stars Freddie Murcheson knows her place, and a tinker’s workshop isn’t it. Unfortunately, that’s exactly where she wants to be. She’s happier sneaking around as Fred Merchant, fixing clockworks and small machines, than she is at high tea or a society ball. After his embarrassing showing in the Steam and Sky Rally, Barnabas Smith-Grenvile accepts what he thinks is an exciting assignment…
  • Review: Chaos Undead by Joshua Roots (Shifter Chronicles #1)

    Jo
    23 Jul 2014 | 10:01 pm
    Chaos Undead (The Shifter Chronicles #1) Joshua Roots Published: Oct. 28, 2013 (Carina Press) Purchase: Amazon Review source: copy provided by author in exchange for an honest review Reviewed by: Jo Rating (out of 5): 3.5 stars When Marcus Shifter, a freelancer combat warlock for the Delwinn Council, chops the head off a shotgun brandishing zombie, he takes his earnings and walks away on a job well done; something felt off though. Seeking the advice of a dark necromancer on parole, Marcus gets the shock of a lifetime when the once decapitated zombie is up, brandishing weapons again and…
  • Giveaway: Burning Dawn by Gena Showalter

    Chelsea
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:05 am
    Sometimes I just like to giveaway books. You understand that because, like me, most of you are book hoarders. Today I have a copy of Gena Showalter’s latest Angels of the Dark book Burning Dawn to send to one lucky VBC reader. It’s paranormal romance goodness, and brings the heat fans of her Lords of the Underworld series expect. You can take a peek at Candace’s review to get a taste of what you’re in store for. If it sounds like your kind of book, just fill out the Rafflecopter form below and you’re entered. Easy peasy. a Rafflecopter giveaway
  • Review: Generation V by M.L. Brennan (Generation V #1)

    Margaret
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:01 pm
    Generation V (Generation V #1) M.L. Brennan Published: May 7, 2013 (Penguin) Purchase: Book Depository or Amazon Review source: library Reviewed by: Margaret Rating (out of 5): 4 stars Fortitude Scott is about as far from the usual alpha male vampire as you can get. He’s a barista with a degree in film theory, a deadbeat roommate and a cheating girlfriend. He drives a beat up Ford Fiesta and his shoes are held together with duct tape. He’s also witty, self-deprecating and his narration is refreshingly original. Fort hasn’t actually begun the transition to full vampire so he’s still…
 
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    LATINA BOOK CLUB

  • INTERVIEW WITH POET LAUREATE THELMA T. REYNA

    Native NYer
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:25 am
       The Latina Book Club is proud to welcome back author Thelma T. Reyna, newly named Poet Laureate of the Altadena Library District.  We’d also like to congratulate Thelma on her new poetry collection.  We want to hear all about its debut in Italy.  Read on!Thelma T. Reyna with her Poet Laureate Award Box.Q:  Congratulations on being selected Poet Laureate.  Tell us about this honor and how it has changed your life.Thank you, Maria. I don’t know how long the Altadena Library District has had a Poet Laureate, but this year I decided to answer a call…
  • COMMENTARY ON LATINA 50-PLUS LUNCHEON

    Native NYer
    24 Jul 2014 | 2:00 pm
        The Latina Book Club welcomes Maria Aponte, artist/author/teacher/founder of the Latina 50-Plus initiative, where Latina trailblazers are honored for their contributions to the community.  We applaud Maria and her vision.Latina 50-Plus Mission Statement:  Latina Fifty-Plus, pays tribute to Latinas over fifty years of age who were pioneers. They shaped their careers in a time when Latina women were venturing onto pathways where very few Latinas were seen or accepted.  This program acknowledges the trailblazers who were among the first in their profession.……
  • 2014 WINNERS OF THE INTERNATIONAL LATINO BOOK AWARDS

    Native NYer
    3 Jul 2014 | 10:02 am
       This year, the International Latino Book Awards were presented during the American Librarians Association Conference in Las Vegas on Saturday, June 29.  (Viva Las Libraries!)  The list of winners contains some of my favorite authors and some new ones I look forward to reading.  I especially look forward to reading the two winning books by Shanaya Fastje and Alina Gonzalez, both 14-years-old with a lot of confidence and charm.Below are some of the winners:Best Young Adult Fiction Book – EnglishYaqui Delgado Wants to Kick Your Ass, Meg Medina;…
  • REVIEW: THE CLOSER by Mariano Rivera with Wayne Coffey

    Native NYer
    29 Jun 2014 | 9:00 pm
      The Latina Book Club is proud to select THE CLOSER as its July 2014 Book of the Month.   “I love being on a team.  You share your triumphs and your troubles.  You share everything.  You are all in it together.  You will do anything for the guys on your team.”“The Bible can’t tell you the story of my walk with the Lord, but it can tell you everything about how I try to live, and why the love of the Lord is the foundation of my whole life.  For me, the Bible is not just the word of God, but a life road map that is packed with wisdom that…
  • BOOK REVIEW: UNBREAKABLE by Kami Garcia

    Native NYer
    22 Jun 2014 | 10:46 pm
         Kami Garcia, one of the co-authors of the popular Beautiful Creatures series, has gone solo and has a new series:  The Legion.  Book 1, UNBREAKABLE, is out now to great reviews.  The book is being called a crossed between "Supernatural" and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer."  It's about a bunch of teens, untrained, uncoordinated, out to save the world.  It's fast-paced, full of intrigue and suspense, with interesting characters.  We love it and you will too.  We have our fingers crossed for a movie!   Happy reading…
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    21tiger

  • Scoutsource

    Michael A. Robson
    19 Jul 2014 | 7:50 pm
    Scoutsource is an app that allows you to catalog and compare pricing and specs on products you’re considering importing. You might see these products during a factory tour or a tradeshow, and need to share them with colleagues overseas for faster decision making. Scoutsource is a clean and clear alternative to sending emails of images with commentary. Keep all your comments and approvals in one place, and do your sourcing faster. Here’s a Marvel Prototype
  • 21Brains

    Michael A. Robson
    19 May 2014 | 4:41 pm
    21Brains was a B2B project involving an iOS app, an Android app, and a web interface, allowing Purchasing Managers and Procurement Managers to share prospective merchandise information with colleagues.
  • Lexicon

    Michael A. Robson
    7 May 2014 | 9:48 am
    Lexicon (‘Lex’ for short; ‘Language Exchange Conversation’ for way too long) is a chatting app just like all the others you’ve got on your iPhone, but with a twist. Not only can you meet new people nearby, and make new friends, but you can learn with them too. Lexicon is designed to facilitate language exchanges, because I believe the best way to learn a language is not reading books, but having fun, enjoying the language with friends. The points system can help improve your ranking in the Lexicon community, making you easier to find for serious langauge learners…
  • Loco

    Michael A. Robson
    21 Apr 2014 | 9:26 pm
    Loco is an iPhone app that would help you locate the best venue to spend time with friends, locating the nearest location for all members (minimizing travel time/distance for everyone involved). It uses Facebook Auth to find friends and GPS to locate them and triangulate the best venue depending on a category (eg. Pizza place, Movie Theatre, etc). It even uses a ‘Top Three Picks’ feature to make the venue choice democratic, settling any disputes on where to go.
  • Midas

    Michael A. Robson
    7 Apr 2014 | 9:49 pm
    Midas is a simple, free iOS app concept that helps you plan out the major investments in your life, starting with getting a College Education. Rather than nagging users for daily updates on expenses, the app uses sound principles of personal finance to set up bite-sized goals for the user, building towards lifelong financial goals such as graduating college, buying your first home, and retirement. Midas uses gamification rewards to motivate users in small chunks towards their lifelong goals.
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    Better World Books

  • This week: Book for Book… for Book!

    Better World Books
    28 Jul 2014 | 8:40 am
    It’s one thing to donate a book every time you buy one. It’s two things to donate two! For three(-ish) days, we doubling our donations—that means not one but two books to our literacy partners for every book purchased on the website. No matter if it’s used or new, this doubles the impact of the donation enabled by your book order for places in the world where books are more difficult to come by. So if you’re feeling a little guilty about your reading budget, consider the difference you’re making in someone’s life. And don’t forget to participate in…
  • Young readers shared these books. And these awesome notes.

    Guest Contributor
    25 Jul 2014 | 8:28 am
    One of the things that inspires us to work here at Better World Books is to join the mission towards literacy. Bringing books to places where books are hard to come by, raising funds around the world, saving books from landfills and finding your old favorite books a home. However there are those days; those Summer days where we would love to be at the beach or by the pool reading our own favorite book as days get hectic here at our warehouse where all the magic happens. It’s very easy to get distracted by everyday life and the stress seems to overcome our little bubble but then we get…
  • Reminder: Don’t forget to submit your video

    Better World Books
    28 Jun 2014 | 12:08 pm
    We recently asked: “What book would you send your younger self?” And the submissions are coming in. If you’ve got a phone or a webcam, be sure to record your video response and let us know here. No matter if it’s 5 seconds, or 5 minutes, we want to know what book you would send your younger self. And once you’re done, don’t forget to vote on other submissions you think are interesting, and share them on Facebook and Twitter. There are some insightful ones on there now, and some funny ones. So let us know your answer, and let others know which responses…
  • Carson Scholars Fund Reading Room Donation

    Better World Books
    28 Jun 2014 | 11:33 am
    We have outgoing book donations in support of literacy and education at all times, but we wanted spotlight this one to let you know about it. We’ve just sent over 2,500 books to the Carson Scholars Fund, an organization that funds reading rooms for schools around the country that are “warm, inviting rooms where children can discover the joy of independent leisure reading.” There are 100 Ben Carson Reading Rooms in 14 different states so far, and counting. From the CarsonScholars.org website: A seventh grader named Sandy said the following about her school’s Ben Carson…
  • Librarians: Have you stopped by our booth at ALA?

    Better World Books
    28 Jun 2014 | 10:51 am
    We mentioned that we’ve got a booth set up at ALA this year in Las Vegas, so here’s a visual so you know what to look for if you’re at the event. Head to booth 1277 and find out about how Better World Books can make your library’s weeding projects have a bigger impact across the board. Here’s a better look at the booth. Come find us while the convention is going on!  
 
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    A Woman Reading

  • Ransom Hunter: Slave Turned Property Baron

    A Woman Reading
    4 Jul 2014 | 2:19 pm
    A photo of the home that Ransom Hunter built along West Glendale Avenue when it was still in good condition in the 1960s or 1970s. By Michael Barrett Originally published by the Gaston Gazette: Saturday, June 21, 2014 at 11:34 AM. No plaques or memorials there state that he is strongly believed to be the first freed slave to have owned property in Gaston County. Nor that his home, livery stable and makeshift general store became the hub of a thriving black community known as “Freedom” in the 19th century. Even his burial site, in a nondescript African-American cemetery along South…
  • Contemporary Romance Author, Kennedy Ryan Raises Awareness for Autism

    A Woman Reading
    8 Apr 2014 | 10:38 am
    Kennedy’s debut novel will be released on June 17, 2014. Published by Forever Yours/Grand Central.    Read Kennedy’s posts on ModernMom.com and YummyMummyClub.ca.  Filed under: Autism, Books, Contemporary Romance, Romance Tagged: Autism, Kennedy Ryan, Love Triangles, Modern Mom, Non-traditional romance, Romance, When You Are Mine
  • Author CJ Matthew Talks Chumash Myths, Shape Shifting Dolphins and Alpha Males

    A Woman Reading
    8 Feb 2014 | 3:58 pm
    By CJ Matthew After the rain and the fury of the storm passes, not many of us can resist the urge to search above us for a rainbow. Even though we possess the scientific knowledge to explain its existence, the array of luminous colors arched across the sky seems magical. Rainbows have fascinated people for eons, and many ancient cultures incorporated the concept of a rainbow bridge into their traditions. The Chumash Myth A rainbow bridge is a pivotal part of the Native American Chumash origin tradition:  To create the Chumash people, Earth Mother Hutash buries the seeds of magical plants on…
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    KID BOOK RATINGS (1111 WORDS)

  • Mr. Pickles Paints The Town

    26 Jul 2014 | 2:10 am
    I wish more people still used the phrase "full of piss and vinegar" these days.  Had to get that off my chest.           THREE PROS*Absolutely love the vibrancy of the illustrations -- a book about colors that doesn't pop would never work for me*Really gets your child thinking outside of the box by allowing them to envision how she or he would repaint the world if given the chance *Even though this conflicts somewhat with the second con below, my son thought it was funny how Peter Pickles just couldn't seem to get it right   THREE…
  • I Love To Eat

    16 Jul 2014 | 2:07 am
    No way! Me too!!                  THREE PROS*Any time a board book gives me three languages (English, French, Spanish) for the price of one, that's a win*Covers the basics while throwing in some normally unseen common mealtime items like a sippy cup and a baby jar *HMH Books upped the ante by using a sturdy design complete with nice 3D finishing touches   THREE CONS *No doubt this is good for a number of readings, but eventually it has to fade*Sure the cover cutout is really eyecatching -- still, I don't suggest you…
  • The Great Friendship Of Koyemsi And TuHavi

    14 Jul 2014 | 8:53 pm
    Something tells me that author/illustrator Joan Mansson and I won't be BFF after this review. THREE PROSThe idea behind the story, which Mansson discovered when researching her own Hopi kachina dolls, is a great allegory for one looking to demonstrate the principles of cooperation, teamwork, and, yes, friendship   Even though the book was too stretched out for my taste, my son seemed interested in it all the way through (full disclosure: he has not asked us to reopen it, despite a little water-testing by me and it being the only book in our living room all weekend)As a fan…
  • EIEIO - How Old MacDonald Got His Farm

    13 Jul 2014 | 5:33 pm
    This has gotta be the most successful agriculture-related endeavor since FarmVille. THREE PROSIt takes a special kind of mind to tackle a classic character reimagination project, but it looks like Judy Sierra is becoming a force to be reckoned with in this arena (improving on earlier attempts like Tell The Truth, B.B. Wolf)*All the little touches are what really allow this book to shine -- especially the composting arc that, once and for all, shows it is possible to polish a turd and make it sparkle *Locating the farm smack dab in the middle of suburbia was a cool idea, not to…
  • Good Night Beach

    9 Jul 2014 | 12:18 pm
    I couldn't resist reviewing a story about a place you will probably visit in the next few months.                  THREE PROS*Any time I can get a longish book that costs me 33 cents per page while still keeping us somewhat entertained is (at least temporarily) worth whatever warts it may have*Cooper Kelly's style isn't my favorite, but his illustrations are undeniably detailed and full of color when compared to other offerings in this genre *It's rare that I learn something from a board book, but this one taught me that those guys that…
 
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    eclectic / eccentric

  • Over Sea, Under Stone by Susan Cooper

    Trisha
    5 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    The first book in Susan Cooper's The Dark is Rising series, Over Sea, Under Stone is a tale I've been meaning to read for years. I actually first purchased this book about 5+ years ago for one of Dewey's Readathons, but I ended up reading the first three books in Cirque du Freak instead (a series I never finished by the way).In the story, Simon, Jane, and Barney Drew are on holiday (damn my American sensibilities love that phrase) in Trewissick visiting their great-uncle Merry, whom they affectionately call Gumerry. When they discover an old manuscript detailing a map, the three children set…
  • Top 10 Favorite Classic Books

    Trisha
    1 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. To learn more about Top Ten Tuesday or see the list of future topics click here.Today's Top 10: Favorite Classic BooksThe Monk by Matthew Gregory Lewis This may be my favorite classic of all time. The entire story is just such a wonderful surprise as the three stories rather effortlessly flow in and out of each other, each one sensationally Gothic in nature. Abounding with monks, nuns, secret passageways, cold corridors, nasty weather, soul-selling witches, prurient interests, superstition, and the occasional dead body, The Monk has a…
  • The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin

    Trisha
    30 Jun 2014 | 2:00 am
    Prior to hearing about The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin on Ana's blog, the book hadn't crossed my mind in almost two decades. Once I read the title, a tiny flicker of memory lit up, and while I could remember no details about the book, a positive feeling persisted. I am so glad I read it again as this book is tricksy fun.Sixteen people are invited to live in a new apartment complex on the banks of Lake Michigan, and later they come together to hear the will of one Sam Westing. Divided into 8 pairs, the confused heirs are challenged to solve the riddle of Westing's death. The winner will…
  • Currently | Active and Tired

    Trisha
    8 Jun 2014 | 2:00 am
    Time and Place // 8:06am, on the couch with Madison who is watching YouTube videos on my phone....like alwaysEating and Drinking // Water. Lots and lots of water.Reading // I can't seem to get into a book right now. I've read the first few pages of Cinder, The Mad Scientist's Daughter, Everything Beautiful Began After, and The Thief, but all were put down and forgotten shortly after. I need a book to get me out of this slump, but nothing is popping out at me right now. At least nothing that I own - and since I have more unread books on my shelves than most people have books total, I feel just…
  • Pilgrim's Wilderness by Tom Kizzia

    Trisha
    4 Jun 2014 | 2:00 am
    Pilgrim's Wilderness: A True Story of Faith and Madness in the Alaska Frontier by Tom Kizzia, a summary in less words than the title: Whackadoodle patriarch abuses family and pisses off everyone else.Oh my Jehoshaphat ladies and gents, this book was crazy reading. I was horrified, I was morbidly awed, I was politically outraged, I was personally offended, I was arrogantly disbelieving, I was floored. If I pick up a book about an uber-religious family with 15 children who want to backwoods it out in the wilds of Alaska, I know what I'm getting into. I have yet to read - or even hear of - such…
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    BOOKVISIONS

  • If You Were Me and Lived in Russia, A Child’s Introduction to Culture Around the World by Carole P. Roman

    Linda
    27 Jul 2014 | 10:05 am
    Next stop Russia! If you have read Carole P. Roman’s earlier series of If You Were Me and Lived in…” books you would by this time feel as though you are on a round the world tour.  All of the books in this series answer the type of questions of most interest to children.  They also teach children that no matter now far apart you live, no matter how different in looks, children and their families have more in common than they have differences with other children around the world. I enjoy reading the books to my granddaughter, and I learn from them too. The stories about local…
  • The Martian by Andy Weir

    Linda
    15 Jul 2014 | 4:41 am
    The first couple of chapters were a little difficult for me to get interested in because of the detailed explanations and math equations by the main character Mark Watney. Once past that, the story fell into place as it brought in the rest of the characters. Astronaut Mark Watney was left for dead on the surface of Mars – only he wasn’t dead, and a frantic attempt at a rescue effort was quickly put together. Most of the book is written diary style with Mark entering his actions, duties, and thoughts as log entries. The story is a very detailed description of the successes and failures of…
  • If You Were Me and Lived in…Portugal – an Introduction to Learning About Other Cultures by Carole P. Roman

    Linda
    14 Jul 2014 | 6:08 pm
    If You Were Me and Lived in…Portugal – an Introduction to Learning About Other Cultures by Carole P. Roman is another in this educational series for children Pre-K to age eight.  This series teaches children about their peers around the world.  It answers questions that children would ask. What do you play with? What do you like to eat? What do you call your parents? Where would you go for fun? What kind of holidays do you celebrate?The illustrations are bright and colorful and portray the story well.  There is a two-page pronunciation guide in the back of the book for…
  • The Hanging Tree by Michael Philip Cash

    Linda
    11 Jul 2014 | 5:07 pm
    The Hanging Treeis an interesting novella that involves a bitter curse, an old tree, a black cat, ghosts, and the lives of two teenagers.  The story goes back and forth in time so that you not only understand the teens, but also the spirits that meet them at the tree.    I enjoyed the story very much especially exploring the relationship with the teen girl, Arielle, and her parents as she gains independence and has to make important decisions.  The bitterness and hatred that has carried over generations takes this story to fascinating places.   I thought…
  • The Crew Goes Coconuts A Captain No Beard Story by Carole P. Roman

    Linda
    10 Jul 2014 | 2:56 pm
    The pirate gang is back in Volume 6 of the Captain No Beard stories.  Polly, Fribbit, Cayla, Hallie, Linus, Mongo, and of course, Capt. No Beard are all here. This time we also meet Matie the goat.The story is about teasing, hurt feelings, and with the guidance of Captain No Beard they learn more about each other and why teasing can be hurtful. Once again, this is a fun, interesting, and entertaining book that children will love, and with an important message.  The illustrations are colorful and fun.  The text is well-spaced for easy reading. I am not good at estimating the age…
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    But What Are They Eating?

  • FOODFIC: Frozen - Melissa de la Cruz & Michael Johnston

    25 Jul 2014 | 9:25 am
    The dystopia created by Cruz and Johnston is pretty much what the title implies – a bleak world of cold and ice, insufferable to all but the heat-eliteof the RSA (Remaining States of America). You could even say the second social tier is comprised of hooved quadrupeds – the few remaining cattle who are nurtured in expensive temperature-controlled stables. The cows probably [live] better lives than most people, in fact.Since clearly very few people are eating beef, the only meat available to the common folk consists of whale, walrus, or reindeer. Those who can’t stomach that are left…
  • FOODFIC: Welcome Serina Hartwell, Author of Hidden

    17 Jul 2014 | 6:54 am
    I first dreamt up the Hidden Saga many years ago, while at the bottom of my garden. It was a hot sunny day in the middle of August and I had a thirst that I just couldn’t quench. As I reminisce, I recall heading down with a glass of fresh orange and sitting for the longest time, just thinking, watching the water condensate around my glass and run down onto the table. Water – That was the only thing that I was sure of when I first made the decision that I really had something worth pursuing in Hidden. I had no idea where my story would take me, but it led me along a path that I’m still…
  • FOODFIC: Dorothy Must Die - Danielle Paige

    11 Jul 2014 | 6:42 am
    Her name may still be Dorothy Gayle, but she is nothing like the girl you remember from that first journey to Oz.She’s still wearing her trademark blue-and-white checks, but she’s traded in the farm-girl cotton for silk and chiffon in a style somewhere between haute couture and French hooker. Mm-hmm.Oh, and she’s wicked now, too. Not in title, of course, as the official wicked witch collective is still around, but as defined by her nasty behavior. And speaking of titles, she’s given herself a bold one: Princess Dorothy of Oz, second only to Ozma, who for all intents and purposes is…
  • FOODFIC: Please Welcome Gilda Evans, Author of Girl Talk

    3 Jul 2014 | 5:23 pm
    Most of my audience knows me as an author and speaker, but few are familiar with my poetry.  My poetry is as diverse as my other writings – the meter, subject matter and innate rhythms vary greatly. The one I’ve chosen to share now is one of my earlier poems. It is freeform with a distinctly feminine subject.  It was inspired on a rather lonely, rainy day several years ago while I was contemplating the view from my window. I felt a most interesting swirl of emotions, that encompassed isolation, peace, sadness, hope and wonder all rolled into a kaleidoscope of feeling that…
  • FOODFIC: Please Welcome St. John Karp, Author of Radium Baby

    26 Jun 2014 | 5:07 am
    My favorite ice-breaker on a first date is, "If you could travel back in time to any period, when would you go?" You can tell a lot about a person by how they answer. A lot of people seem to want to meet Jesus, which is legit, although they conveniently forget to set aside time to learn Aramaic first. My own choice would be the 1920s. They were in the middle of a post-war cultural revolution — it was the golden age of the silver screen, Dadaism was turning into Surrealism, you couldn't sneeze without hitting ten radioactive consumer products, and they spoke English. The sheer amount of cool…
 
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    Andy Straka

  • Drones and Private Eyes

    andy
    13 Jul 2014 | 10:00 am
    From the NY Post. You had to know this was coming…. http://nypost.com/2014/07/13/private-eyes-using-drones-to-nab-scammers-cheating-spouses/              
  • A Witness Above hits #1 on Amazon Ebook Bestseller (free) List!

    andy
    30 Jun 2014 | 4:05 pm
             
  • War Dogs Film

    andy
    29 Jun 2014 | 3:38 pm
    Saw this short documentary on service dogs helping veterans suffering from PTSD last night at the Ruff Cuts Film Festival. Very moving. Watch it here. http://wardogsfilm.com/
  • Game, Set, Match

    andy
    8 Jun 2014 | 1:52 pm
    Very cool. Raptors are being used for pigeon abatement at the French Open (not to mention three of the four Grand Slam tournament sites according to this article from the Wall Street Journal.)   http://online.wsj.com/articles/fiercest-match-of-french-open-tennis-tournament-raptor-vs-pigeon-1402101392  
  • Summer Steal

    andy
    5 Jun 2014 | 7:39 am
    The Blue Hallelujah ebook edition is now on sale for $0.99 through June 19. Five Star Superlatives: “Best Novel of Suspense and Mystery I have read in a long time…Andy Straka comes right at your heart with this writing. There is no letting go until you finish the Epilogue.”                  -David Syrett “Wow! This book is absolutely stunning! Even this old non-believer was moved by the spiritual aspects of it…Too many superlatives? I don’t think so.” -Arthur L. Hellyer “Explore[s] issues of life, death and the nature of evil while…
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    The Browser

  • The Raw Material Of Wealth | Ricardo Hausmann | Project Syndicate | 28th July 2014

    Ricardo Hausmann
    27 Jul 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Poor countries that export raw materials may think their best way to riches lies with blocking the exports and processing the raw materials themselves, as South Africa has done. But that’s a very narrow view, and may be a trap. Finland didn’t get rich by processing its timber. It got rich by building machines to process the timber, then applying the machine-building skills in new fields of tech and engineering Subscribe to the Browser to receive a feed with direct links to the recommended content
  • Money Talks: The Language Of Finance | John Lanchester | New Yorker | 28th July 2014

    John Lanchester
    27 Jul 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Financial language baffles outsiders with its jargon and density. Such opacity is not necessarily sinister: sometimes words are complicated because reality is complicated. But we should make a special effort to understand. “Incomprehension is a form of consent. If we allow ourselves not to understand this language, we are signing off on the prospect of an ever-widening gap between the rich and everyone else”Subscribe to the Browser to receive a feed with direct links to the recommended content
  • You Are Not Too Late | Kevin Kelly | Medium | 27th July 2014

    Kevin Kelly
    26 Jul 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Imagine being an online entrepreneur in 1985, when nothing had been invented and every dotcom name was available for free. Paradise. But come 2044, we’re likely to feel the same about 2014: All the great stuff of the future is still to be invented. Barriers to innovation are lower than ever. “The last 30 years has created a marvellous starting point, a solid platform to build truly great things. You are not too late” Subscribe to the Browser to receive a feed with direct links to the recommended content
  • Wild Speculation On Hamas And Its Rocketry | Alex Harrowell | Yorkshire Ranter | 25th July 2014

    Alex Harrowell
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Rockets are a very inefficient way of killing people, especially when they don’t have effective guidance mechanisms. But rockets can have a powerful disruptive effect: which is why Hamas uses them, and why it has concentrated, at least until now, on range rather than accuracy. “Siege is a fundamentally economic form of warfare; the Israelis are besieging Gaza, and the Gazans are trying to impose a counter-siege”Subscribe to the Browser to receive a feed with direct links to the recommended content
  • Russia Is Pregnant With Ukraine | Vladimir Sorokin | New York Review Of Books | 24th July 2014

    Vladimir Sorokin
    23 Jul 2014 | 6:00 pm
    Magnificent satire from Russia’s greatest modern novelist. Worthy of Blake or Gogol. “During that hot month, sitting in front of an overheated television set, Russia conceived. A new life stirred in her enormous womb: Free Ukraine. The authorities were horrified, the liberals were jealous, and the nationalists were filled with hatred. Neither the Kremlin nor the people had anticipated such a rapid development of events”Subscribe to the Browser to receive a feed with direct links to the recommended content
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    BookLeverageBlog

  • Book Review – Podcast Launch

    George Rodriguez
    24 Jul 2014 | 12:53 pm
    One of the great products of the internet has been the rise of the self-made internet millionaire. Much like a Horatio Alger story, the internet millionaire embodies the hero’s struggle. He or she is a good guy/girl who just wants to do right, but they find themselves in a tough spot. It could be a bad boss, a job with no future or just a feeling of despair that the life they are living is not meant for them. But our hero finds a way out, somehow using the internet to make their fortune.  See Jeff Walker, Chris Guillebeau or John Acuff, et al. And the obvious next step in this path is to…
  • Bookleverage on YouTube!

    George Rodriguez
    22 Jul 2014 | 2:05 pm
    I’m on a mission to spread the love of non-fiction far and wide. And that is why Bookleverage is now on YouTube. At least for me when I get on YouTube the only book commentary I see is about sexy vampires, a dystopian future with love-crossed teenagers or a combination of the two. But not anymore nonfiction book lovers, because Bookleverage is on YouTube for good! I’m going to start out with videos that I create on Powtoon, but I might eventually come out with videos starring yours truly doing video book reviews and talking about nonfiction books in general. That might be better…
  • Little Fears

    George Rodriguez
    16 Jul 2014 | 2:21 pm
    So there I was, staring at the screen, thinking over my options. Do I press OK and release the start of my dream to the world (or at least my Facebook friends) or do I move on and just accept the status quo? It’s funny the little fears and the big tests that we all face as we struggle for success.  And what would seem to others as nothing, take on gigantic proportions in the minds of some. I want to start a newsletter.  I want to provide value to people so they will sign up and find out for themselves what I offer is helpful, useful and a positive in their lives.  I want to build…
  • Just What the World Needs, Another Newsletter

    George Rodriguez
    15 Jul 2014 | 1:46 pm
    I’m in the process of putting together a bi-monthly newsletter.  Bi-monthly means twice a month.  And I only say that because like most people I wonder why people don’t just say twice a month. But when you are talking about newsletters you have to say bi-monthly or the newsletter police send you a letter. So why another newsletter? As someone who pooh pooh’s society’s fascination with “surfing the net” as a timesuck in general, I have to admit that I subscribe to many newsletters because they offer so much value. I can’t get to everything on the…
  • 10 Things I Learned – The Second Machine Age by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee

    George Rodriguez
    13 Jul 2014 | 5:39 pm
    The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies is a great book for anyone wondering what technology means for the future of work and society.  With amazing technological progress comes good and bad side effects and Brynjolfsson and McAfee not only chart the positive outcomes of the machine age, but also delineate the threats to businesses, employees and the future of work. Here are ten things I learned after reading this excellent book: 1.  The second machine age will be just as disruptive as the Industrial Revolution Now comes the second machine…
 
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    The New Podler Review of Books

  • First Stone by Gary Ballard

    16 Jul 2014 | 8:13 pm
    Forensic psychologist Dr. Jack Carter wakes from a semi-catatonic state in a mental hospital with no memory of the previous year. His wife, Sarah, has disappeared, and as the last human being to see her alive, Jack is the prime suspect in her disappearance. Without a body and with no physical evidence to prove foul play, the lead investigator and Jack's friend, Bill West, must continue to search for the truth even if it means fingering Jack for the crime. When a serial killer in West Virginia's coal country claims to have killed Sarah Carter, Bill and Jack rush to the crime scene. What they…
  • Cover Critics

    18 Jun 2014 | 7:09 am
    Over the last couple of years, I've written about how important it is for an indie author to have a good cover for their book. I've invited several indie authors here to talk about the process they went through to get their covers, whether doing it themselves or hiring a professional. M. Terry Green pointed me in the direction of affordable, professional designers who offer pre-designed and customizable covers—the growing list can be found by clicking on our "Book Cover Designers" tab.While we've seen a decrease in the number of bad covers submitted here, there seems to be no shortage…
  • Justice, Inc. by Dale Bridges

    3 Jun 2014 | 8:06 am
    Imagine a future where orphan children are adopted by international corporations and forced into indentured servitude, where zombie viruses are spread through heterosexual intercourse, where Osama bin Laden is cloned by the thousands for public execution. Welcome to the world of JUSTICE, INC. No one is safe. Nothing is sacred. And all sales are final.Justice, Inc. is a collection of short stories written by Dale Bridges and published by Monkey Puzzle Press. It is due to be released on June 20th.All in all, this is a solid collection of 21st century American satire. "In the Beginning: An…
  • Magic’s Heart by Thomas Oliver

    16 May 2014 | 2:00 pm
    If you write about a quest to deliver a magical object to a far-flung destination and thereby save the world from evil, you had better be up to the challenge, for your brave travelers unwittingly toil in the shadows of Frodo and Sam. Thomas Oliver makes a credible foray into this formidable subgenre with Magic’s Heart. This novel’s would-be heroes are a close-knit family whose members each possess a distinct magical talent. Seventeen-year-old Aliya has an affinity for bodies of water and the creatures that inhabit them. Her twin brother Crick has highly developed outdoor skills honed…
  • Shadowcursed by Gelo Fleisher

    13 May 2014 | 11:34 am
    Bolen is a thief, plying his trade under the spires of an ancient and sprawling city. Worried that he's growing too old, Bolen has lined up a risky job, just to prove that he can still pull one off.Tonight, he's going to break into a nobleman's vault and help himself to its contents. What he doesn't know is that inside is the key to a secret as old as the city itself.Kings have killed for it, demons have coveted it, priests have prayed for it, and in a few moments it will be in his hands. And when it is, the adventure of his life will begin.I was drawn in by the protagonist, Bolen. He's a guy…
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    Any New Books?

  • This week’s new Kindle ebooks

    Any new books?
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:34 pm
    Here are this week’s new releases for the category ‘Kindle’. ★ Our Staff Pick ★ The Fantastic Laboratory of Dr. Weigl: How Two Brave Scientists Battled Typhus and Sabotaged the Nazis Stores: USA | UK By Arthur Allen Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company Publication date: July 21, 2014 Share this book on Twitter | Facebook | Google+ Clinton, Inc.: The Audacious Rebuilding of a Political Machine Stores: USA | UK By Daniel Halper Publisher: Broadside Books Publication date: July 22, 2014 Share this book on Twitter | Facebook | Google+ Tom Clancy Support and Defend…
  • This week’s new books in Programming

    Any new books?
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:22 pm
    Here are this week’s new releases for the category ‘Programming’. ★ Our Staff Pick ★ Functional Thinking: Paradigm Over Syntax Stores: USA | Canada | Kindle | UK Kindle By Neal Ford ISBN: 1449365515 Publisher: O’Reilly Media Publication date: July 20, 2014 Binding: Paperback Estimated price: $29.63 Share this book on Twitter | Facebook | Google+ JavaScript & jQuery: Interactive Front-End Web Development Hardcover Stores: USA | Canada By Jon Duckett ISBN: 1118871650 Publisher: Wiley Publication date: July 21, 2014 Binding: Hardcover Estimated price:…
  • This week’s new books in Mathematics

    Any new books?
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:22 pm
    Here are this week’s new releases for the category ‘Mathematics’. ★ Our Staff Pick ★ Taming the Unknown: A History of Algebra from Antiquity to the Early Twentieth Century Stores: USA | UK | Italy | Kindle | UK Kindle By Victor J. Katz, Karen Hunger Parshall ISBN: 0691149054 Publisher: Princeton University Press Publication date: July 21, 2014 Binding: Hardcover Estimated price: $36.34 Share this book on Twitter | Facebook | Google+ Precalculus with Integrated Review and Worksheets plus NEW MyMathLab with Pearson eText — Access Card Package Stores: USA |…
  • This week’s new books in Travel

    Any new books?
    23 Jul 2014 | 12:47 pm
    Here are this week’s new releases for the category ‘Travel’. ★ Our Staff Pick ★ Travels With Casey Stores: USA | UK | Canada | Italy | Kindle | UK Kindle By Benoit Denizet-Lewis ISBN: 1439146934 Publisher: Simon & Schuster Publication date: July 22, 2014 Binding: Hardcover Estimated price: $9.99 Share this book on Twitter | Facebook | Google+ Hope Runs: An American Tourist, a Kenyan Boy, a Journey of Redemption Stores: USA | UK | Canada | Italy | Kindle | UK Kindle By Claire Diaz-Ortiz, Samuel Ikua Gachagua ISBN: 1410470733 Publisher: Thorndike Press…
  • This week’s new Teen books

    Any new books?
    23 Jul 2014 | 12:44 pm
    Here are this week’s new releases for the category ‘Teens’. ★ Our Staff Pick ★ Homeroom Diaries Stores: USA | Canada | Italy | Kindle | UK Kindle By James Patterson, Lisa Papademetriou ISBN: 0316207624 Publisher: Little, Brown and Company Publication date: July 21, 2014 Binding: Hardcover Estimated price: $9.25 Share this book on Twitter | Facebook | Google+ Strange and Ever After Stores: USA | Italy | Kindle By Susan Dennard ISBN: 0062083325 Publisher: HarperTeen Publication date: July 22, 2014 Binding: Hardcover Estimated price: $10.79 Share this book on…
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    A Travelers' Library

  • Back to Maine with Paul Doiron

    Vera Marie Badertscher
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:29 am
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  • NEW YORK CITY–THE BOOK LIST

    Vera Marie Badertscher
    21 Jul 2014 | 10:58 am
    We've Moved! Update your Reader Now. This feed has moved to: http://feeds.feedblitz.com/feedburner/atravelerslibrary Update your reader now with this changed subscription address to get your latest updates from us.
 
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    My Book and My Coffee

  • Guest Post: The Next Idea by May Williams

    23 Jul 2014 | 8:16 am
    Where and how do you get ideas for your next book? May Williams, author of Raising Her Hopes, is here today to talk about getting that 'next idea'. Check it out! Also, don't forget to enter the nice giveaway below! :) Writers are always looking for the next idea or trying to refine the ones circulating in their heads in order to get a book from the brain to the page. To help me along, I like to talk to new people and ask lots of questions. When I’m experiencing something new, I’m always thinking about using it in a book. So I ask even more questions. Recently, on a family…
  • WW Giveaway: Manroot by Anne Steinberg

    30 Jun 2014 | 7:14 am
    Today's giveaway features the fantasy, romance novel of Anne Steinberg, Manroot. Take a look and please enter the giveaway below. :)  Manroot by Anne SteinbergFantasy, RomanceBook Description: In the spring of 1939, Katherine Sheahan and her father, Jesse, are looking for work in the isolated tourist town of Castlewood. Jesse gets a job as handyman and Katherine as a maid at a small hotel. Jesse drinks and neglects his work and eventually disappears, abandoning his daughter. Frieda Broom, the hotel Manager, takes Katherine under her wing, and teaches her about ginseng, the manroot,…
  • Guest Post: My Love Affair with Florida by Amie Denman

    25 Jun 2014 | 6:51 am
    Hello lovelies! Amie Denman, author of The Gull Motel, is here today to share a guest post about her 'love affair' with Florida. I haven't been to Florida... yet, and it would be great to have her book on my ever-growing TBR so at least I have an idea. Plus, this sounds like a wonderful story. Check. Added. :) Amie is on currently on blog tour to support her newly released novel, The Gull Motel, a sweet contemporary romance. Let's read and share this guest post ... and, oh, don't forget to enter the giveaway after reading! :)When Savvy Thorpe rolls into The Gull Motel on the Gulf…
  • Author Spotlight: L. A. Cadieux

    24 Jun 2014 | 7:24 am
    Welcome to my first ever Author Spotlight post! :) I am very happy to introduce L.A. Cadieux to all of you, lovelies! She is the author of the newly released young adult novel, One Life.  P.S. Don't forget to enter the giveaway at the end of this post :) Connect with L.A.: Website | Blog | Goodreads | Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+Keeping busy isn’t a problem for L. A. Cadieux as she balances a hectic life as a mom of two, plus her career as an IT project manager and newly published author—but she wouldn’t have it any other way. As a child known for…
  • WW Giveaway: A Native’s Tongue by Michael D. Dennis

    20 Jun 2014 | 7:48 am
    WEEKEND LOVE! Enter this giveaway for a chance to win an eBook copy (Kindle version) of A Native’s Tongue by Michael D. Dennis. A Native’s Tongue by Michael D. DennisRelease Date: June 2014As I walked out under the Los Angeles sky, the possibility of becoming something more than a short order cook, living in the valley, and resenting my dysfunctional family occurred to me…Charlie Winters has never been an overachiever. He is used to just getting by while living with his single mother and working a dead-end job at a cheesesteak stand. Meanwhile, he’s constantly grappling with…
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    Where Writers Win

  • Can Too Many Choices Keep You From Author Greatness?

    Shari Stauch
    27 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    Our thanks to publicist Lynda Bouchard for this guest post. And… drum roll, please – This marks our 400th post at WWW! To celebrate, anyone signing up for our Winner Circle from now ’til July 31, 2014, can take $20 off with promo code VIPW20. Visit writerswin.com/join-today to sign up now! Brilliant accomplishments are nearly always the result of a consuming passion. Whether in business, marriage or sports, those with passion have a motivation that is undeniable. Just watch the performance of a passionate golfer, baseball player or musician. Passion is the highest form of…
  • Freebie Friday: 3 EBooks and Bublish’s New EPub Creator

    Shari Stauch
    25 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    On this week’s Freebie Friday, three free ebooks guaranteed to refine and refresh your blogging efforts, and an update from Bublish on its new EBook Creator, making it even easier to post your book on Bublish’s free social discoverability platform! Enjoy the weekend… From PushingSocial Sign up for their free newsletter and you can download three free ebooks from guru Stan Smith, including: 50 Blog Design Tweaks How to Sell With Your Blog 7 Secrets the Experts Forgot to Tell You Just visit pushingsocial.com and you’ll get a pop-up window that sets you on your way. You…
  • Four Reasons You Must Have Book Cover Blurbs!

    Shari Stauch
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    Our thanks to Sandra Beckwith of Build Book Buzz for this guest post! And our additional thanks to Sandra for offering our tribe a $10 discount on “Blurbs, Endorsements, and Testimonials: How to Get Experts, Celebrities, and Others to Endorse Your Book,” her new multi-media program that teaches you how to get those essential endorsements! Use the exclusive Where Writers Win coupon code, WWW, to get the multi-media program for just $19… While skimming discussion topics in an online group for authors last week, one conversation-starting question caught my eye: “Should I bother to…
  • Is Your Book for Sale at Kindle Unlimited?

    Shari Stauch
    21 Jul 2014 | 6:01 am
    Yep, it’s here. You can now sign up for Amazon’s Kindle Unlimited, their new service that grants access to 600,000 e-books and several thousand audiobooks for $9.99 a month. Kindle Unlimited will add new challenges to negotiations between Amazon and publishers. Books published by HarperCollins and Simon & Schuster aren’t offered and those from Penguin Random House are notably absent. But what’s in it for indie authors and those published by small presses? And how can YOUR books be there? Like recent articles we’ve done, Getting Your Book on Scribd and How to…
  • Writer Platform: What About Wattpad?

    Shari Stauch
    19 Jul 2014 | 5:00 am
    We first wrote about Wattpad in March, 2013, back when they had “only” 13 million readers. We’re happy to report this is one writer platform that’s seriously on the rise.  Now with 25 million users and growing, and 40 million free online stories to read, Wattpad has become an even greater force to be reckoned with for both emerging and experienced authors. They also recently acquired Redroom, another favorite former site of ours for writers. (We hope they bring an author profile piece to Wattpad – it was an attractive part of Redroom.) One of the greatest…
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    Bizzybiz Blog

  • 50 Shades Illogical

    23 Jul 2014 | 1:49 pm
    I read and review Fifty Shades Freed so you don't have to.I don't even know where to begin. Maybe with the question I kept thinking over and over during this last section: I'M SORRY, WHAT?????E.L. James spends the last two numbered chapters of her book trying to wrap everything up in a neat little package. SPOILER ALERT: SHE FAILS. Instead what happens is she creates more questions than she answers, and the few things she does answer have explanations that make NO SENSE. I mean, AT ALL. Seriously, even working from within the horrifying stereotypes she's set out for her characters and "why…
  • The Invasion Continues

    22 Jul 2014 | 4:06 am
    I am hysterical right now.I have mentioned before that this house has a spider problem. That problem is getting worse. StereoNinja sprays and sprays, and all that happens is they start showing up where he hasn't sprayed. Spray the corners? They move to the middle of the crown moulding. Spray the whole perimeter of the ceiling? They move down to the middle of the wall. Spray the walls? "Fine, we'll just crawl on the floor!" they laugh derisively.It's a daily, multiple spider problem. I didn't write about it at the time because it was a happy post, but while I was cleaning the living room for…
  • And Now For Something Completely Different

    19 Jul 2014 | 12:24 pm
    Last night I spent several hours watching some 70-year old men tell penis jokes. If this sounds like a weird thing to do, let me follow that up by saying said men are the surviving members of Monty Python, and that I did NOT get choked up when I realized I was singing "Always Look on the Bright Side of Life" with the actually Pythons, and I definitely did not cry when they put "Graham Chapman 1941-1989" up on the screen behind them. They say this is the last time, and while celebrities "retire" all the time, this is entirely likely - John Cleese is 75 years old and it's starting to…
  • 50 Shades Absurd

    17 Jul 2014 | 9:57 am
    After a long absence, the penultimate review of Fifty Shades Freed, read by me so you don't have to.Here's what this book is doing to me: in the three chapters that I read for this review, a husband threatens to rape his wife but the only part I got upset about was that E.L. James has no fucking idea how banking works. I'm a monster.When we last saw our heroine asshole, she was (dramatically at the end of a chapter) staring at a completely benign and innocuous but for its originator text message on a phone belonging to her husband that she "accidentally" turned on. Chapter 21 begins with…
  • MAJOR NEWS!

    17 Jul 2014 | 9:54 am
    GUESS WHAT EVERYBODY. I am about to post the long awaited second (or maybe third) to last Fifty Shades Freed review. I know you probably think I forgot about it or gave up, but I didn't, I just had a combination depression/school is hard and takes up a lot of time/everything in my whole life changed at the same time and I freaked out/ wait, where did all my money go so fast? thing going on, and I could barely face blogging AT ALL, let alone writing exceptionally long blog posts about something that I genuinely hate reading and/or thinking about. But I finally got around to writing the review…
 
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    Soul Destruction

  • FREE on Kindle: ‘Life’ a short crime story

    Ruth Jacobs
    15 Jul 2014 | 1:40 am
    Max’s criminal career has been going downhill since it began when he was sixteen on an armed robbery job with his father. Now in his mid-forties, he’s spent more time in jail than on criminal endeavours and he’s back inside again.
  • The Sex Trade: Lies, the ‘Voice of the Voiceless’ and Other Silencing Tactics

    Ruth Jacobs
    8 Jun 2014 | 1:07 am
    Most people are voiceless because no one is letting them talk or listening to them when they do. There is a lot to be said for quitting being the voice of the voiceless and letting people speak for themselves. But not by those seeking to abolish the sex trade. Words are put into people's mouths when they can be, and when they can't, those people are silenced and dismissed.
  • APPG on Prostitution and the Global Sex Trade Report “Shifting the Burden” Increases Violence Against Women

    Ruth Jacobs
    23 Apr 2014 | 1:29 am
    With politicians' infamy for 'shifting the burden', this was not the best title for an All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) report. Chosen to reflect their recommendation of shifting the burden of criminalisation from the seller of sex to the buyer, in practice this fails as badly as when politicians endeavour a cover up - like why was this group funded by a religious anti-gay charity!?
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    Book reviews, author interviews

  • 10 Books That Will Make You Laugh Out Loud

    Sherry Helms
    25 Jul 2014 | 4:34 am
    Author: Sherry Helms They say laughter is the best medicine. It is scientifically proven that laughing not only relieves physical tension and stress but also boost our immune system. So, in order to give you good and hearty chuckle, we scanned our bookstore and came across with these 10 book titles. Some of these books […]
  • The Industrial Diet: The Degradation of Food and the Struggle for Healthy Eating

    Sherry Helms
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:10 am
    Guest author:  Anthony Winson  If you are like me, you have spent plenty of time in supermarkets and other food environments surrounded by edible products and tremendously frustrated that few of them were the least bit healthy to eat. And the more you know about the link between nutrition and your health the more frustrated […]
  • The Red Canary

    Sherry Helms
    21 Jul 2014 | 4:40 am
    Guest Author: Tim Birkhead I am a scientist and I love birds. I have spent my career studying birds in various parts of the world. As a boy, I had an aviary full of birds but I also watched wild birds. Those two strands one captive, one wild, were my ornithological apprenticeship. Keeping birds gets […]
  • Living the Dream

    Sherry Helms
    17 Jul 2014 | 3:31 am
    Guest author: Lisa Bullard Growing up, my career ambitions often wavered between detective, spy, and mad scientist. It turns out that writing children’s nonfiction books is a great way to live a little bit of each of those! Just as a detective would, I start with a basic question that needs to be answered:  How […]
  • The Recall: Tribunal of the People

    Sherry Helms
    14 Jul 2014 | 3:04 am
    Guest Author: Joseph Francis Zimmerman I am a governmental reformer who supports use of direct democracy devices—the recall, the initiative, and the protest referendum—activated by petitions to ensure elected public officers are accountable to the voters. These devices were advocated by populist and progressive reformers in the late 19th century and the early 20th century […]
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    Books Without Any Pictures

  • “The Darkest Part of the Forest” by Holly Black

    Grace Troxel
    28 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
      Disclaimer: This is a ridiculously early review. Under normal circumstances I’d wait to post this review until much closer to the publication date, but Holly Black is important.  My little sister is a huge Holly Black fan, and since we live several states away from each other, I wanted to read/review The Darkest Part of the Forest before passing the book along for her to read. I love the way that Holly Black manages to blend a story about contemporary teenagers with the faerie mythology.  There’s this town called Fairfold.  It’s your typical rural American town,…
  • Write-On Review-a-Thon

    Grace Troxel
    26 Jul 2014 | 3:48 pm
    The Write On review-a-thon is a monthly event created and hosted by Brianna at The Book Vixen. It’s 2 days dedicated to getting reviews done, whether you have one review to write or 30+. This edition of the review-a-thon takes place all day Saturday, July 26th and Sunday, July 27th. Let’s get those reviews done! I love the idea of this event and it’s focus on catching up and getting reviews written. Here are the ones that I’d like to write and schedule this weekend: The Farthest Shore by Marian Perera The Mark of the Tala by Jeffe Kennedy I’m... Read more » The post…
  • “The Book of Life” by Deborah Harkness

    Grace Troxel
    24 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
      At long last, the conclusion to the All Souls Trilogy is here!  For anyone new to the series, it’s about a witch who stumbles upon an old manuscript at Oxford’s library that holds secret knowledge relevant to witches, demons, and vampires.  This review does contain some spoilers from earlier books, so if you haven’t read them, check out the first two reviews instead. Diana Bishop is a witch who fell in love and married a vampire named Matthew Clairmont.  Witches, vampires, and demons are bound by a historical agreement called the Covenant, which prevents them from…
  • “Clariel” by Garth Nix

    Grace Troxel
    20 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
      Disclaimer: This is a ridiculously early review. When I was a teenager, I was obsessed with Garth Nix’s Abhorsen trilogy.  I read and re-read Sabriel and Lirael until the paperbacks very clearly showed how much they’d been loved, and jumped for joy when Abhorsen was finally released.  Nix’s stories had everything to love–undead villains, strong protagonists, sarcastic kitties, bardic weapons, and enchanted paper airplanes that you can really ride in. Now, almost a decade later, Garth Nix is finally releasing Clariel, a prequel novel set several hundred years…
  • Strange Chemistry and Exhibit A Reading Month

    Grace Troxel
    20 Jul 2014 | 3:10 pm
      This summer, Angry Robot’s young adult imprint Strange Chemistry and mystery imprint Exhibit A abruptly shut down.  Strange Chemistry was my favorite YA imprint, and it was a place that I could go to look for quality young adult sci-fi and fantasy that featured grand adventures rather than tired love triangles.  I’m very sad about Strange Chemistry’s loss, and many other bloggers feel the same.  [Note: I don't really read many mystery/crime novels, so I don't know enough about Exhibit A to do more than just mention them.] Little Lion Lynette’s is hosting a…
 
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    Susan Roebuck

  • Saving Grace Devine by Catherine Cavendish

    Susan Roebuck
    1 Jul 2014 | 3:32 am
    One of my favorite authors has a new release today from Samhain Publishing - Saving Grace Devine. She's here today to tell us about her lovely new book, so let's welcome up-and-coming writer: Catherine Cavendish who's going to tell us the spooky story that inspired Saving Grace Devine (and it IS spooky, just as I like it).The Lady of Lake CrescentIn my new novel, Saving Grace Devine, a young girl is drowned, but her spirit returns to haunt the lakeside where she met her untimely end. She seeks help from the living, to help her cross over to the afterlife.From my research, it would appear…
  • Catherine Cavendish's Gothic Influences

    Susan Roebuck
    6 May 2014 | 12:00 am
    Buy from AmazonMy good friend and talented writer Catherine Cavendish has signed on with Samhain Publishing and today Linden Manor, her Samhain Gothic Antho. Competition Winner is published!Catherine is a prolific writer of acclaimed horror novels and short stories (just take a look at her Amazon page: Amazon Page and her blog).So, congratulations Cat! I'll be one of the first buying your new book and I'll review it here. In the meantime, Catherine tells us who and what has influenced her writing:Catherine's Gothic Influences – M.R. JamesM.R. JamesI am often asked whose…
  • One of the Books that's made the Greatest Impact on me in 2014

    Susan Roebuck
    2 May 2014 | 10:15 am
    Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity by Katherine BooMy rating: 5 of 5 starsThis is on my list of best books read in 2014Based on truth about life in one of Mumbai's slums that borders Mumbai's sumptuous new airport and the Hyatt Hotel, this book is humbling. Life in these slums could be on Mars, it's hardly believable that humans still live like this (the book is set from 2008 to 2010) amid the clear corruption, inefficiency and sheer cruelty of the Mumbai police, the gangs and politicians.I laughed at the ironic scene when one of the inhabitants is…
  • My Writing Process

    Susan Roebuck
    9 Mar 2014 | 9:25 am
    www.morguefile.com. Alentejo - setting for my new novelThere’s a new meme doing the rounds and this is it. I was tagged by talented children's author Kate Kelly (author of Red Rock, a cli-fi thriller for age 10+). She challenged me to answer a few questions about my writing. So here goes…1. What am I working on?I have my new completed women's/commercial fiction novel out on submission at the moment so this is a nervous time, wondering if I'm going to be accepted. In the hope that this will be the first in a series of books set in a fictional fishing village on the east coast of…
  • The Winners!

    Susan Roebuck
    2 Mar 2014 | 12:29 pm
    Late as usual - aren't we Brits supposed to be punctual? Must be the Portuguese unpunctuality rubbing off on me. A week ago (ahem - just over) I posted a little competition (here) to see how much my lovely followers knew about Portugal. I was surprised that you knew so much and also had a good laugh at some of your answers. Here were the questions: 1. What's the capital of Portugal? (easy peasy)2. Name a famous Portuguese author. Have you read anything by him or her?3. When someone says, "Portugal", to you, what's the first thing that comes into your head?4. If you came to Portugal on an…
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    Digesting the Words

  • Incubus (Daughters of Lilith #2) by Jennifer Quintenz #BookReview

    Farhana Chowdhury
    11 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    This book was sent to me to review in return for an honest review. At no point did I receive any payment for this review. Digesting The Words contains associate/affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy for more info.Incubus by Jennifer Quintenz Series: Daughters of Lilith #2 Genres: Demons, Fantasy, Love & Romance, Young Adult Pages: 295 Format: eBook • Buy from Amazon UK • Braedyn Murphy used to think nothing important ever happened in her sleepy town of Puerto Escondido. But that was before she learned she was a descendent of Lilith, the mother of all demons. Now Braedyn fights to…
  • The Luthier’s Apprentice by Mayra Calvani #BookReview & Excerpt

    Farhana Chowdhury
    7 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    This book was sent to me to review in return for an honest review. At no point did I receive any payment for this review. Digesting The Words contains associate/affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy for more info.The Luthier's Apprentice by Mayra Calvani Series: Violinist Detective Series #1 Genres: Fantasy, Love & Romance, Paranormal, Supernatural, Young Adult Pages: 184 Format: eARC • Buy from Amazon UK •Niccolò Paganini (1782-1840), one of the greatest violinists who ever lived and rumored to have made a pact with the devil, has somehow transferred unique powers to another……
  • The Vagrants by Yiyun Li #BookReview

    Farhana Chowdhury
    30 Jun 2014 | 6:05 am
    The Vagrants by Yiyun Li Published by HarperCollins UK Published date 2013-03-28 Genres: Asian Literature, Fiction, Historical Fiction Pages: 352 Format: Paperback Brilliant and illuminating, this astonishing debut novel by the award-winning writer Yiyun Li is set in China in the late 1970s, when Beijing was rocked by the Democratic Wall Movement, an anti-Communist groundswell designed to move China beyond the dark shadow of the Cultural Revolution toward a more enlightened and open society. In this powerful and beautiful story, we follow a group of people in a small town during this dramatic…
  • A Long Way Down by Nick Hornby #BookReview

    Farhana Chowdhury
    9 Jun 2014 | 12:00 am
    This book was sent to me to review in return for an honest review. At no point did I receive any payment for this review. Digesting The Words contains associate/affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy for more info.A Long Way Down by Nick Hornby Published by Penguin Genres: Contemporary, Fiction Pages: 288 Format: Paperback 'Can I explain why I wanted to jump off the top of a tower block?' For disgraced TV presenter Martin Sharp the answer's pretty simple: he has, in his own words, 'pissed his life away'. And on New Year's Eve he's going to end it all . .
  • The Mortal Instruments 1-3 #BookSeriesReview

    Farhana Chowdhury
    8 Jun 2014 | 12:00 am
    I’ve been meaning to review The Mortal Instruments ever since I read the first 3 books last year. Now that the final book City of Heavenly Fire has been released I’ve got sufficient motivation to finish the entire series. (Check out my experience at the City of Heavenly Fire book release event in London) But before I finish the series, I wanted to write the first half of the series review! General I loved reading The Mortal Instruments 1-3 and I felt like they made a good trilogy. I even watched the City of Bones movie when it came out because I was that invested in the…
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    Reading in the Garden

  • The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón

    28 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    Secrecy and Surprises in Spain (Mysterious Intrigue) The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón is about a boy’s investigation into the enigmatic life of author, Julián Carax. After reading Carax’s novel The Shadow of the Wind,Daniel wants to enjoy more of his books only to discover that someone has systematically burned every copy of his published works.  As the story progresses Daniel enlists the help of a co-worker, ex-political prisoner, ex-bum, and always entertaining Fermín, to get to the bottom of this mystery.  What they discover is a puzzle that slowly reveals the…
  • The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka

    21 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    Take a Walk on the Weird Side(Classics) The Metamorphosis (Die Verwandlung) by Franz Kafka is a super-short, 59-page, surreal classic.  Think—Salvador Dali in written format.  One morning Gregor Samsa wakes up to discover he had transformed into a monstrous bug. Strangely, his first thought isn’t “Holy, crap!  What’s happened to me?!!!”  It’s more like “OMG, I’m going to be late for work!” Now, that’s not a sign of a dedicated employee. It’s pure and simple fear.  His boss is a real orb-smasher, if you know what I meanIn the living room, his…
  • The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde

    14 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    Wild About Oscar (Classics)The Importance of Being by Oscar Wilde is a brief, 55-65 page play, depending on the edition. It’s also one of Oscar Wilde’s most famous works.  First performed on stage in 1895, it is a comedy of deception and misunderstandings.  Two friends both assume the name “Ernest” to impress two different women who happen to love that name. Enter a droll butler or two, a snobbish aunt, and mix it all up with snappy dialogue and you have ready-made smiles. It’s fun. It’s short. And it’s worth a look. You can find it online at:…
  • The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin

    7 Jul 2014 | 12:00 am
    A Life of Books(Quick and Touching)The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin is about a curmudgeonly bookstore owner who has slipped into depression and alcoholism after his wife died in a car accident. Without Nic, A.J. is suffering and so is business since she was the people person. At 39, he’s just looking forward to retiring, and the rare edition of and Edgar Allan Poe book is his ticket out of there, until there’s a snag.  Someone stole it. And that’s not all. In the greatest twist of fate, a baby is left in his store with a note from the mother stating that she can no…
  • Moby-Dick by Herman Melville

    30 Jun 2014 | 12:00 am
    Moby-Dick by Herman Melville (A Whale of a Book) Moby-Dick By Herman Melville was a whale of a challenge.  This was one of the few books that had defeated me in the past. I had started it years ago and just couldn’t get into it. I found it overly wordy and dry. It was like a mouthful of crackers with no water in sight. The more I read, the more it pulled me down into the dark, deep abyss of boredom. It was close to 500 pages of Benadryl in print. Yawn—and I didn’t even get far into it.  Then, I did the unthinkable—I just gave up.  I moved on. I pushed it out of my mind,…
 
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    Tolstoy Therapy

  • Books or Marriage? The Dilemma of Charles Darwin in 1838

    Lucy
    24 Jul 2014 | 10:56 am
     My God, it is intolerable to think of spending one's whole life, like a neuter bee, working, working and nothing after all.—Darwin in 1854, aged 45, then working towards publishing On the Origin of SpeciesIt's July 1838, and Charles Darwin has just returned from a break in Scotland to remedy his overwork. Upon opening one his trademark notebooks, we might think he's about to jot down some thoughts on animal breeding or geological variation. However, he instead divides a piece of paper into two, before writing the following headings: "Marry" and "Not Marry".Choosing whether or not…
  • 'Give War and Peace a Chance' This Summer with Andrew D. Kaufman

    Lucy
    19 Jul 2014 | 10:22 am
    My copy of Give War and Peace a Chance,before it was covered in Post-it notes.If there were any book I'd be desperate to read,  it would involve the life lessons we can gain from Leo Tolstoy and War and Peace. This explains why I was so excited to receive a copy of Give War and Peace a Chance: Tolstoyan Wisdom for Troubled Times by likeminded Andrew D. Kaufman in the post this week.My goal of reading Tolstoy every August is coming round fast, and I have to say this has made for some ideal pre-reading.Kaufman, a Russian scholar, successfully makes War and Peace appear what to…
  • Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's Idea of 'Flow' & How We Can Create it by Reading Great Fiction

    Lucy
    16 Jul 2014 | 1:53 pm
    Flow: a brilliant book which remindsus to get reading great fiction.I've noticed that Flow: The Psychology of Optimum Experience by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi has been mentioned in so many books I've been reading lately. Lisa Zunshine's Why We Read Fiction is the first example which comes to mind, but I know there are many other instances. Flow has become a landmark text as well as a bestseller, and I think it's deserved.If you haven't read Flow, it outlines Csikszentmihalyi's theory that people are happiest when they are in a state of flow— a state of concentration or…
  • 18 of The Best Feel-Good Classic Novels (Mood-Boosting Summer Reading, Part II)

    Lucy
    10 Jul 2014 | 7:48 am
    I really enjoyed compiling my list of feel-good novels to enjoy reading this summer, and it got me thinking about mood-boosting classic literature.Perhaps 'classic literature' is a little hard to define, but hopefully these suggestions will help prove that mood-boosting books don't need to be modern and recently published. Even those books that frequently feature on school syllabuses can bring a smile, I believe!Some novels in my original list fit this category - the brilliant Three Men in a Boat as one, another being All Creatures Great and Small  - but here are a few more…
  • James Joyce's Daughter and the Possible Influence of Her Schizophrenia on Finnegans Wake

    Lucy
    4 Jul 2014 | 5:56 am
    Paris, 1929: Lucia Joyce dances at Bullier Ball.Lucia Joyce, born 1907 to James Joyce and Nora Barnacle, learned Italian as her first language, studied ballet as a teenager, and was believed to have casually dated Samuel Beckett. However, after being diagnosed with schizophrenia in Zurich, Lucia was sent to an institute in Ivry-sur-Seine, France, in 1935 and in 1951 to St Andrew's Hospital in Northampton, where she died at the age of 75.In Lucia Joyce: To Dance in the Wake (2003), Carol Schloss demonstrates her opinion that Lucia had been her father's muse for Finnegans Wake, the…
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    Book Club Reading List

  • Author Interview – Sarah Hill

    admin
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:40 am
    What inspired you to write this book?   This particular book is written for the month of November (as each book in my Whimsy Wood children’s series is written for a specific month in the calendar, so the flora and fauna within the wood change […]
  • Author Interview – Suanne Laqueur

    admin
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:34 am
    What inspired you to write this book?   The characters of Erik and Daisy have existed in my head and in short, written vignettes since I was in college. But I had no storyline for them, no start-to-finish dramatic arc. It was only recently, when […]
  • Author Interview – Mark Fine

    admin
    26 Jul 2014 | 5:59 pm
    What inspired you to write this book?   Having the benefit of time and space, I decided to explore the circumstances that led to my emigration from South Africa in the late 70′s. But my personal story is not that fascinating, but through the eyes […]
  • The Hero Spell

    admin
    26 Jul 2014 | 5:36 pm
    Extraordinary pony farm manager Audra Dawson does it all, training ponies, teaching children to ride and looking after the livestock. Her life will be fantastic when she weds the cowboy of her dreams even if he now sees her as a sister and a woman […]
  • The Man I Love

    admin
    26 Jul 2014 | 5:31 pm
    Some seek the limelight and some hold the light in place. Nineteen-year-old Erik Fiskare is drawn to the world of theater but prefers backstage to center stage. The moment he lays eyes on a beautiful, accomplished dancer named Daisy Bianco, his atoms rearrange themselves and […]
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    Long Island Pulse

  • “North of Normal: A Memoir of My Wilderness Childhood, My Unusual Family, and How I Survived Both”

    info@lipulse.com
    23 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    You stopped in the store the other day, and stopped short. In all its electric-colored glory, tie-dye is back. Or maybe it never left, just passed down by Baby Boomers like you who also loved groovy music, an everybody-helps-everybody mentality, and how wonderfully carefree that felt. Ah, the good ol’ days… or were they?  For author Cea Sunrise Person, the answer was “no” for years, but in her new memoir “North of Normal,” she explains how she made peace with it. Cea Sunrise Person’s grandfather was more at home in nature than he was anywhere else. He’d always wanted to…
  • “The Illusionists” by Rosie Thomas

    info@lipulse.com
    16 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    Now you see it. Now you don’t. The magician’s coin jumps from hand to hat and though you’re astounded, that would be an easy trick to learn. You could research, and know how he made an elephant disappear. You could teach yourself how to conjure the right card from a deck. But why would you? Being baffled is half the fun – unless your life depends on sleigh of hand. And then, as in the new novel “The Illusionists” by Rosie Thomas, the trick’s on you. At the age of ten, and just before he killed a boy, Hector Crumhall fell in love with magic. He couldn’t quite get over the…
  • “The Skeleton Crew” by Deborah Halber

    info@lipulse.com
    9 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    You can’t find your keys.  Again. It happens every now and then: you get busy, distracted, and you put them down somewhere they don’t belong. Then you spend an hour looking for them. Fortunately, you always find them because they won’t travel far without you. But, as you’ll see in the new book “The Skeleton Crew” by Deborah Halber, some things go missing for a lot longer… Wilbur Riddle was a well-driller back in May of 1968 and was waiting for a job to start when he noticed a canvas sack on a stone slab just off Kentucky ’s Route 25. As he got closer, he could see that…
  • “The Pocket Book of Weather” by Michael Bright

    info@lipulse.com
    3 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    c.2013, Adlard Coles Nautical / Bloomsbury     $18.00 / $20.00 Canada     144 pages A stranger – unknown, but not unfamiliar – told you what to take to work today. She also told you how to dress the kids, what to avoid this weekend, where to park the car, and whether or not you should water the garden. And you appreciated the information; after all, what would you do without your weather forecast?  In fact, you wanted more - and when you’ve got “The Pocket Book of Weather” by Michael Bright around, you’ll get it. For as long as there have been people,…
  • “The Promise” by Ann Weisgarber

    info@lipulse.com
    24 Jun 2014 | 5:00 am
    It was a vow you took very seriously. Friends forever, you said in school. Til death do you part, you uttered in front of an altar. Semper fi, on my honor, read my lips, it’ll get done, I’ll be there. It’s easy to make a pledge to someone. It’s not always easy to keep it – especially, as in “The Promise” by Ann Weisgarber, the covenant is a big one. Catherine Wainwright was well aware that she’d caused quite a scandal. It was bad enough that she’d kept company with another woman’s husband. It was brazen to touch Edward’s arm in public and they were seen alone together at…
 
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    Beth's Book Reviews

  • Featured Book: Cloning Around by Dee Rose

    Beth (BBRB)
    27 Jul 2014 | 11:26 pm
    About the book: Special Agent Robert Bassett is an action junkie. He constantly tries to live up to the name of his legendary father, Reed Bassett, who was also an FBI agent. However, it is Reed’s last case that finds Robert trapped in a violent mission of blood, terror, revenge and clones. A scientist, Dr. Richard VanHellman, has finally uncovered the way to create clones. He intends to rule the world by murdering, and then cloning it’s most powerful people. Dr. VanHellman has the unique gift of reading people’s minds, of which he also uses to control his clones. Once Robert realizes…
  • Review: Denali's Howl by Andy Hall

    Beth
    26 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Denali’s Howl is the white-knuckle account of one of the most deadly climbing disasters of all time. In 1967, twelve young men attempted to climb Alaska’s Mount McKinley—known to the locals as Denali—one of the most popular and deadly mountaineering destinations in the world. Only five survived. Journalist Andy Hall, son of the park superintendent at the time, investigates the tragedy. He spent years tracking down survivors, lost documents, and recordings of radio communications. In Denali’s Howl, Hall reveals the full story of an expedition facing conditions conclusively…
  • Review: The Artificial Intelligence Revolution by Louis A. Del Monte

    Beth
    25 Jul 2014 | 9:00 pm
    The Artificial Intelligence Revolution by Louis A. Del Monte is a warning regarding the threat new artificial intelligence (AI) technology poses to the survival of humankind. Will the future come down to man versus machine, when the singularity is near? Will an artificial intelligence robot be your friend or foe?Scientists are working relentlessly at improving AI technology for the benefit of man. Evolved technology is everywhere-smart TVs, smart phones, and even smart houses. One day the artificial intelligence of these machines will match our own intelligence-and one day it will exceed the…
  • Author Q&A: Katherine Svoi Symthe author of Unbreakable

    Beth
    25 Jul 2014 | 7:00 pm
    Katherine Svoi Symthe, author of Unbreakable: The Unrelenting Spirit of Katherine Svoi Symthe, stopped by for a Q&A.Can you tell us a little bit about yourself?I am a writer, owner of House of SVOI Inc. and Healing Survivors, Creating Thrivers. I am now a thriver helping others who have been victims of human trafficking and abuse. The goal is to raise awareness, and education into the epidemic.What do you do when you're not writing?I help others and spend time with people. I love to be around others that are authentic and are deeply caring.When did your first start writing?I started at 7…
  • Giveaway: The Magician's Land by Lev Grossman

    Beth
    25 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    The stunning conclusion to the New York Times bestselling Magicians trilogyQuentin Coldwater has lost everything. He has been cast out of Fillory, the secret magical land of his childhood dreams that he once ruled. Everything he had fought so hard for, not to mention his closest friends, is sealed away in a land Quentin may never again visit. With nothing left to lose he returns to where his story began, the Brakebills Preparatory College of Magic. But he can’t hide from his past, and it’s not long before it comes looking for him. Meanwhile, the magical barriers that keep…
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    The Literary Yard

  • Story: Shaking Loose

    Author
    26 Jul 2014 | 10:11 am
    By: Bob Kalkreuter Roger White sat on the unscreened porch, watching the morning fog creep up the hillside like a ghost without feet. He held a can of beer and […]
  • Poem: To the first ones

    Author
    25 Jul 2014 | 8:56 am
    By: Civa Bhusal I adore everything- That came first in my life The first book I read The first game I played The first lap – I slept on The […]
  • Poem: Memories

    Author
    25 Jul 2014 | 8:51 am
      By: Civa Bhusal One day, All the people we saw in our life leave us in solitude… Just like the drops of water Leaving the topmost part of the hills […]
  • The Puzzlement Of Ancient Spirituality

    Author
    24 Jul 2014 | 6:31 am
    By: Raymond Greiner Comparing ancient living design to modern society is a study in contrast. Archeological discoveries reveal ancient cultures imposed greater communal value on spirituality. This evidence is compelling […]
  • Poem: Wolf Down the Hall

    Author
    23 Jul 2014 | 12:04 am
    By: Dovile Mark When I was young There lived a wolf Down the hall of our apartment building My parents called him a neighbor He might have even had a […]
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    WordTrance

  • Poetry in Prose

    Michael
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    WordTrance - Reading and Writing Genre Fiction Prose is the go-to method when writing fiction. It is basic text without regard to any structure or the sound of words. It is clear, straight-forward, easy to understand, and The post Poetry in Prose appeared first on WordTrance.
  • In the Tall Grass by Stephen King & Joe Hill

    Michael
    9 Jul 2014 | 4:45 am
    WordTrance - Reading and Writing Genre Fiction In the Tall Grass During a cross-country trip, siblings Cal and Becky Demuth stop to investigate the sounds of a child calling for help from the surrounding field of grass. The post In the Tall Grass by Stephen King & Joe Hill appeared first on WordTrance.
  • A Study in Emerald by Neil Gaiman

    Michael
    25 Jun 2014 | 5:12 am
    WordTrance - Reading and Writing Genre Fiction A UNIQUE MIX Weaving together horror and a detective story, Neil Gaiman crafts a unique and inventive short-story using his customary charming voice. Specifically, A Study in Emerald combines the The post A Study in Emerald by Neil Gaiman appeared first on WordTrance.
  • Laugh Out Loud! Top Five Humour Books For Children

    Michael
    11 Jun 2014 | 8:07 am
    WordTrance - Reading and Writing Genre Fiction The key to getting children interested in reading is to keep them entertained and a great way of doing this is through humour. Some of the finest writers of children’s The post Laugh Out Loud! Top Five Humour Books For Children appeared first on WordTrance.
  • Esoteric Fiction with Agostino Scafidi

    Michael
    6 Jun 2014 | 4:39 am
    WordTrance - Reading and Writing Genre Fiction We’ve been patiently waiting in line for years now! It’s been way too long since anyone has given us the go ahead to feel some relief and it’s high time we get our The post Esoteric Fiction with Agostino Scafidi appeared first on WordTrance.
 
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    Peter J StoryPeter J Story

  • Notable Quotes: 27

    Peter J Story
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    “Accept that writing is about writing, nothing more and nothing less, it’s not about being perfect. You don’t have to be the next Hemingway. You get to be someone unique and rare. You get to be you. So, be the matchless, remarkable you.” —– Bryan Hutchinson
  • Ask Grak 4: Stage Name

    Peter J Story
    27 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    User Nameless in Nantucket asks: Dear Grak, I’m a simple fellow from Nantucket who just turned 40 last week. In light of this milestone, I decided I’d like to switch careers from accounting to acting. Of course, I’m not naive; I know a lot of work is required before I can achieve this goal. For example, I’ll ...
  • Notable Quotes: 26

    Peter J Story
    26 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    “Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.” —– Author Unknown
  • Ask Grak 3: Carless in Seattle

    Peter J Story
    25 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    User Carless in Seattle asks: Dear Grak, I’m a married man, with no children to speak of yet. I live happily–for the most part–in my big house with my three wives. My problem is that I only have two cars, which isn’t enough for four people, evidently. My wives constantly squabble and seem to hate each other, and ...
  • Notable Quotes: 25

    Peter J Story
    24 Jul 2014 | 7:00 am
    “The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter–it’s the difference between the lightning bug and the lightning.” —– Mark Twain
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    Little Miss Bookmark

  • Reveiw: Never Kiss a Rake (Scandal at the House of Russell #1) by Anne Stuart

    14 Jul 2014 | 6:46 pm
    Bryony Russell and her two sisters are left destitute by the disgrace and unexpected death of their father, a wealthy shipping magnate. He left a cryptic note, and Bryony is determined to find the real villain and clear her father’s name. In disguise as a servant, Bryony infiltrates the home of her father’s business partner to find proof of his guilt…or innocence. It’s not just clues that Bryony finds, but temptation too…Adrian Bruton, Earl of Kilmartyn, immediately suspects there is something not quite right about his new housekeeper. The brooding, irresistible rake plays along…
  • Review: Run by Andrew Grant

    11 Jul 2014 | 9:23 am
    Marc Bowman, a highly successful computer consultant and software designer, walks into his job at a major tech company one morning only to find himself fired on the spot, stonewalled by his boss, and ushered out of the building. Then things get worse: An explosive argument drives his wife away and a robbery threatens to yank a million-dollar idea—and his whole future—out from under him. In a matter of hours, Marc has gone from having it all to being sucker-punched by fate. But it’s only Monday, and before the week is over, he’ll be stalked, ambushed, wiretapped, arrested, duped,…
  • Cover Reveal & Giveaway: Life AD 2: M.I.A.: Missing in Atman by Michelle E. Reed

    10 Jul 2014 | 9:02 pm
    Welcome to the Cover Reveal forLife AD 2: M.I.A.: Missing in Atman by Michelle E. Reedpresented by Month9Books!Be sure to enter the giveaway found at the end of the post! Dez is finally hitting her afterlife stride. She hasn’t missed a meeting or session in forty-two days, and she’s put the adventures and danger of her first days at Atman behind her. Life after death is becoming tolerable, yet nothing is quite what she’d hoped. Confusion over her feelings for Charlie, residual resentment over losing Hannah, and a continuous stream of unwanted assignments leave Dez restless and…
  • Review: Dark Paradise (Dark Paradise #1) by Angie Sandro

    6 Jul 2014 | 6:56 pm
    DARK LEGACYMala LaCroix has spent her whole life trying to escape her destiny. As the last in a long line of "witch women," she rejects the notion of spirits and hoodoo and instead does her best to blend in. But when she finds a dead body floating in the bayou behind her house, Mala taps into powers she never knew she had. She's haunted by visions of the dead girl, demanding justice and vengeance.DEADLY SECRETSLandry Prince has always had a crush on Mala, but when Mala discovers his sister, murdered and marked in some sort of Satanic ritual, he wonders if all the rumors about the LaCroix…
  • Review: Wide Awake (Wide Awake #1) by Shelly Crane

    6 Jul 2014 | 6:24 pm
    A girl. A coma. A life she can't remember. When Emma Walker wakes up in the hospital with no knowledge of how she got there, she learns that she's been in a coma for six months. Strangers show up and claim to be her parents, but she can't remember them. She can't remember anyone. Not her friends, not even her boyfriend. Even though she can't remember, everyone wants her to just pick up where she left off, but what she learns about the 'old her' makes her start to wish she'd never woken up. Her boyfriend breaks up with the new girl he's dating to be with her, her parents want her to start…
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    List Top 10List Top 10

  • Springs of Prosperity

    Rayon
    24 Jul 2014 | 4:32 am
    REVIEW~ Springs of Prosperity by Torkom Saraydarian So much materials have been published about the techniques of creative visualization and how to manifest one’s desires but very few have been brave and honest enough to write about the conditions or entitlements on how and when can we attract the things or outcomes we wish for. There is no free lunch in what they call the “universe”. Just like in the material plane, we can’t just grab anything from a store without paying for it. Same laws apply to the realm of the mind and occult planes of existence. “You…
  • The Magic of Thinking Big

    Rayon
    22 Jul 2014 | 4:36 am
    REVIEW~ Written by David J. Schwartz, this book attracted my attention simply by the title. This aligns Perfectly with the secret. It tells you about how important your thinking process is. Think your second best and an under achiever and that is what you will produce, think you are equal to the best and produce your best. To me the best quote in this book is “the thinking that guides your intelligences is much more important than how much intelligence you may have” This in short simply means it does not matter how much intelligence you have all that matters is how you use the…
  • The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

    Mohammed Jamma
    22 Jul 2014 | 2:52 am
    Review It all began one night; the late Douglas Adams, drunk out of his wits, fell on his back onto a grassy field. His sight met with outer space, all dark and starry-eyed as it stared back at him. Pondering on how vast the universe must be, Adams raised up the idea of a group of hitchhikers travelling through it, whilst causing mischief and damage along the way. All around him, his friends were too busy drinking the night away to care. The appropriately titled book, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to The Galaxy, was his input to the field of science-fiction. Broadcast first as a radio program in…
  • Psychic Energy

    Rayon
    21 Jul 2014 | 3:46 am
    REVIEW~ The writer gave an energisation technique which can be seen as an alternative to the traditional Middle Pillar method given in both the preceding books. He excluded the energization of the centers below the diaphragm on grounds that they are already active in most people. Most of the psychic skills and materialization procedures he included in the book are achieved through the generation of ‘psychic energy’ as he called it, instead of using self-hypnosis, NLP, or any subconscious mind manipulation techniques. When our bodies get low on fuel, we usually feel hunger to…
  • The Space Merchants

    Mohammed Jamma
    18 Jul 2014 | 2:03 am
    Review In our current day and age, consumerism is the rule for many. Following the desolation of the Second World War, the planet braced itself for more trouble in the form of nuclear destruction. Despite the bleak situation, a new type of class was emerging in America: The Middle. This so-called nuclear family consisted of Mom, Dad, Junior, and the ever adorable Tammy. Dad came back from war, married Mom, and together, they played their part in the Baby Boom. Unemployment seemed a thing of the past as more jobs were available, and Dad could provide for the family, whilst Mom had the kitchen…
 
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    TolkienBlog.com

  • Who is Celebrimbor?

    Emily
    27 Jul 2014 | 3:01 pm
    With the recent release of the new Shadow of Mordor trailer, a lot of people are wondering, “Who is Celebrimbor?” The short answer: he’s the Elf who forged the Rings of Power (except the One Ring). He was the remaining survivor of a powerful house of Elves. To understand the significance of this, you have to know a little more about… Read more The post Who is Celebrimbor? appeared first on TolkienBlog.com.
  • Upcoming Tolkien Biopics

    Emily
    26 Jul 2014 | 1:45 pm
    There are rumblings in Hollywood that the Tolkien craze isn’t over. In fact, there are at least two different Tolkien biopics in development. The information is still a little sketchy and there’s no word on who will be cast as the Professor. There are some interesting tidbits, which I’ve rounded up below, along with references for where I got the info.… Read more The post Upcoming Tolkien Biopics appeared first on TolkienBlog.com.
  • Significant Dates in LotR

    Emily
    20 Jul 2014 | 4:11 pm
    One of Tolkien’s predominant characteristics was his minute attention to detail. From the Prologue to the Appendices, The Lord of the Rings is replete with scrupulous detail. Because he was so thorough in all of the particulars of his stories, a careful reader can learn a great deal of Tolkien’s mind and of his sub-creation. In Appendix B, for instance, Tolkien provides… Read more The post Significant Dates in LotR appeared first on TolkienBlog.com.
  • Silmarillion Character Profile: Finrod

    Emily
    17 Jul 2014 | 2:02 pm
    One of the most daunting things about reading The Silmarillion is keeping all of the names straight. I love this, so I want to make it more accessible for the general reader with brief character profiles. Name: Finrod Felagund Immediate Family: Father & Mother: Fingolfin & Anairë Brother #1: Orodreth Brother #2: Angrod Brother #3: Aegnor Sister: Galadriel Home: born in Valinor, lived in… Read more The post Silmarillion Character Profile: Finrod appeared first on TolkienBlog.com.
  • Very Inspiring Blogger Award

    Emily
    15 Jul 2014 | 10:05 pm
    James at A Tolkienist’s Perspective was kind enough to nominate TolkienBlog.com for the Very Inspiring Blogger Award. Thank you, James! I really appreciate it. I did a little research on this award. I’m not sure where it started, but it’s a way to connect bloggers and readers. Of course it’s meant to honor bloggers, but I think the main purpose… Read more The post Very Inspiring Blogger Award appeared first on TolkienBlog.com.
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    jonathanrex.com

  • Body Sculpting

    J Rex
    27 Jul 2014 | 6:29 pm
    When I was four years old I began going with my father to Taekwondo classes in San Francisco and continued doing it up until High School. Growing up I also played baseball, basketball, football and briefly studied Judo and Boxing as well. If one were to see me as a child it would be very [&hellip
  • Cultural Appropriation

    J Rex
    26 Jul 2014 | 9:39 am
    Is there a difference between Cultural Exchange and Cultural Appropriation? This seems to be an issue that a lot of people are discussing lately and the answer to me is actually fairly simple. Yes, there is a difference. If I encounter another people and through my encountering them we draw inspiration from each other and [&hellip
  • Die Antwoord

    J Rex
    1 Jul 2014 | 7:27 pm
    Die Antwoord is an Independent South African Rap-Rave group featuring lead vocalists Watkin Tudor Jones (Ninja) and Anri du Toit (Yolandi Visser) along with their DJ, Hi-Tek. Jones previously released albums with prior groups Max Normal and Constructus Corporation before teaming up with his personal assistant Anri and forming Die Antwoord in 2008. With the [&hellip
  • The Magus

    J Rex
    1 Jul 2014 | 7:14 pm
    It’s very rare that I pick up a work of fiction and read it from beginning to end in one sitting without any interruptions. The Magus by John Fowles was that rare exception. The paperback cover is what initially caught my eye (I’m pretty basic and any image of a fit nude woman gets my [&hellip
  • Bones and Blues

    J Rex
    1 Jul 2014 | 7:08 pm
    From 1946 to 1961 the Soviet Union banned music from the United States and Western Europe. Owning certain Jazz, Blues and Rock N Roll records could get you thrown out of school and in extreme cases sent to prison camps. Anytime something is made illegal an underground black market fills the void established by restrictions [&hellip
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